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Full text of "The first regiment of New York volunteers, commanded by Col. Jonathan D. Stevenson, in the Mexican war. Names of the members of the regiment during its term of service in Upper and Lower California, 1847-1848, with a record of all known survivors on the 15th day of April, 1882, and those known to have deceased, with other matters of interest pertaining to the organization and service of the regiment"

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STEVENSON'S REGIMENT 

IN CALIFORNIA. 



' O>: 





BANCROFT LIBRARY 






1846-1882. 

THE FIRST REGIMENT 



OF 



HEW YOBK VOLUNTEERS 



COMMANDED BY 



COL. JONATHAN D. STEVENSON, 

IN THE MEXICAN WAR. 



NAMES OF THE MEMBERS OF THE REGIMENT DURING ITS TERM OF 

SERVICE IN UPPER AND LOWER CALIFORNIA, 1847-1848, WITH A 

RECORD OF ALL KNOWN SURVIVORS ON THE I S TH DAY 

OF APRIL, 1882, AND THOSE KNOWN TO HAVE 

DECEASED, WITH OTHER MATTERS OF 

INTEREST PERTAINING TO THE 
ORGANIZATION AND 

SERVICE OF THE 
REGIMENT. 



COMPILED BY THEIR COMRADE, 

FRANCIS D. CLARK 



GEO. S. EVANS & Co., PRINTERS, 38 CORTLANDT STREET. 
1882 



NOTE. 

The names recorded in this work have been 
furnished by GENERAL R. C. DRUM, Adjutant- 
General of the Army, from the official rolls of 
the regiment on file in the WAR DEPARTMENT. 
The record appended to each name has been 
prepared with great care, notwithstanding which 
inaccuracies may be discovered. Those survivors 
to which an * is attached, the information was 
derived directly from themselves by letter or 
personal interview to those reported deceased, 
the date and place of death is given, where the 
information could be obtained ; in all cases where 
the State is not designated, the place mentioned 
is in California. Comrades in perusing the rolls 
are particularly requested to report any error or 
information omitted. 

F. D. C. 



Tf-ffl EAftC T UERAi 









/;S HKV 





INTRODUCTION. 



COMRADES: 

In presenting this Liliputian volume no apology is offered. 
It contains all the information and facts possible in a space 
of necessity limited by the funds contributed therefor by a few 
of our comrades. You will find, however, a record that may 
prove interesting and valuable to all the names of those who 
served in the regiment during its term of service in California, 
a record of those known to be living, also of those known 
to have deceased. This information, while not as complete as 
desired, has been acquired during a period of eleven years, 
requiring over one thousand written communications, and the 
distribution, during that period, of some fifteen hundred printed 
circulars and postal cards addressed to comrades, involving 
labor and expense of which this little waif fails to give the 
reader an adequate idea ; the labor, however, \vas one of love, 
and I trust it may prove an acceptable offering to my surviv 
ing comrades and their friends. 

Thirty-five years have elapsed since our regiment landed 
.on the soil of California, and over thirty-three years have 
passed since the Government dispensed with our services, leav 
ing each member of the regiment free from further military 
service, and thereafter to assume the responsibility of citizen 
ship, each for himself to carve out his own future. In one 
respect we were favored beyond any other regiment serving 
during the Mexican war, in being discharged in California the 
same year that gold was discovered at Sutter's saw-mill, but a 
few months subsequent to that event, and it is to be regretted 



8 



that so few of us are enjoying the benefits resulting from 
that wonderful discovery. Yet it is a question whether that 
discovery was not as unfortunate for ourselves, as it proved 
to be for many others in the country, including that noble old 
pioneer, General John A. Sutter, through whose instrumentality 
the discovery was made. Is it not a matter of fact, that it 
somewhat rudely invaded happy homes, and interrupted the 
peaceful, prosperous, and contented lives then being led by the 
native population of California. 

I will make no attempt to lay before you the difficulties 
experienced in obtaining the information presented in these 
pages. The long period that elapsed since the discharge of 
the regiment, had erased from the memory of the majority of 
our comrades the recollection of events, many died within a 
few years subsequent to their discharge from the service, many 
were scattered to remote parts of the world, and too many 
were disinclined to take up the pen to transmit a record of what 
their memory may have retained, but others freely contributed 
such information as they possessed or could obtain. 

My own experience regarding the surviving members of the 
regiment has undoubtedly been that of others. In 1870 
when I first entered upon this self-imposed task I knew of 
only two other members of the regiment living in New York 
notwithstanding my having been engaged in business there for 
the fifteen years prior to that date, I ascertained that during 
that time twelve others were also residents of the city ; but 
considering the fact that the members of the regiment were 
conveyed to California in six transports, and while in California 
were stationed in eight towns, it is not to be wondered that 
to a great extent they were almost strangers to each other, 
many acquaintances being formed subsequent to their discharge 
from the service. 

A homely but familiar adage says: "Self praise is no recom 
mendation;" all that is given in these pages in commendation 
of our old organization comes from those who were in nowise 



connected therewith; and from that evidence may our fellow- 
citizens judge of its character; to these impartial critics may 
we safely entrust our record, which now forms part of the 
history of our beloved country. 

In 1871, and again in 1874, you were furnished with a 
pamphlet giving the result of my researches up to those dates. 
With this publication I bring my labors to a close, trusting 
they have not been altogether in vain ; should they be the 
means of renewing old acquaintance, after so long a separation, 
or of reviving old associations of those eventful days, I shall 
feel amply repaid for the time and labor expended thereon. 

In conclusion, I beg to tender my sincere thanks for the 
courtesy, kindness and assistance granted to me by the Hon. 
Robert T. Lincoln, Secretary of War General William T. 
Sherman, U. S. A. who, having served contemporaneous 
with us in California, has upon many occasions in late years 
exhibited his friendship for the members of our regiment Gen. 
R. C. Drum, Adjutant General U. S. Army, Col. Jonathan D. 
Stevenson, (our Colonel), Col. Thomas C. Lancey, and John Q. 
Adams, Esq., and to the press of the Golden State. 

FRANCIS D. CLARK, 

Late Co. D, First Regt., N. Y. Vols. 



RETROSPECT. 



IN 1846, the year war was declared between the United States 
and Mexico, the question of a journey to the Territory of Cali 
fornia, was one for no little consideration, as it seemed some 
what like being exiled from the civilized world; and in those 
days few had occasion or desire to visit that distant land ; 
whether the choice was a voyage by sea or overland the time 
required to reach Yerba Buena, now San Francisco, was from 
five to six months. A few Americans were residents of the 
country at that time, having found their way there by vessels 
trading for hides and on whaling voyages; others following the 
course of the setting sun across the plains, scaling the Rocky 
Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, found themselves upon the 
Pacific coast, and becoming infatuated with the life of ease and 
plenty afforded by its delightful climate, arid the opportunity of 
securing a livelihood with little or no toil, by engaging in stock- 
raising, they were influenced in making California their home. 
For a time Americans were highly esteemed by the native Cali- 
fornians, and, with rare exception, received with the warmest 
hospitality. In a few years, however, the Mexican officials be 
gan to look upon the Americans with jealousy and suspicion, and 
to assume an attitude of hostility, so serious, indeed, that on the 
i4th day of June, 1846, the Americans banded themselves to 
gether for self-protection under the celebrated "Bear Flag," and 
had not the declaration of war between the two countries been 
proclaimed at the time it was, open hostilities would soon have 
waged between the American settlers and the Mexican forces on 
duty in the territory. 



1 1 



Early in the summer of 1846, President Polk decided upon 
sending a force of volunteers by sea to the Pacific Coast, also 
Co. F of the 3d U. S. Artillery, by the U. S. storeship Lexing 
ton. Among the lieutenants of this company were the present 
General of the Army, William T. Sherman, and General E. O. C. 
Ord, U. S. A. ; also the late General Henry W. Halleck, then 
captain in the engineer corps. General Stephen W. Kearny was 
ordered to proceed overland with a squadron of dragoons, via 
New Mexico. Captain John C. Fremont, with a surveying party, 
having arrived in California during the month of January, 1846, 
remained upon the soil of Mexico with his small command, no 
doubt under the instructions of our Government, and upon the 
outbreak of hostilities took a very prominent part. These move 
ments on the part of the army were for the purpose of taking 
possession of and holding California, with a view to its acquisi 
tion on the cessation of difficulties between the two countries. 
Mr. Polk little suspected what a store of wealth he was securing 
to the future benefit of his country when he conceived this 
purpose, for scarcely two years elapsed ere the discovery of gold 
at Sutter's Saw-mill proclaimed to the world that the El Dorado 
had been found within the domain of our great Republic; wealth 
for centuries laid hidden, had now been revealed through the in 
domitable spirit of progress, civilization, and enterprise which 
ever follows the footsteps of the American pioneers of the West. 
Nearly thirty-six years have elapsed since President Polk directed 
the organization of that regiment of volunteers in the Empire 
State for duty in California; a body selected with great care, the 
intention of the Government being that these volunteers, the 
majority of whom were under twenty-one years of age, should be 
discharged in that country at the close of the war, thus forming 
a colony, around which would cluster Americans then in the 
country, as well as those who would afterwards find their way to 
that distant land in search of homes. Many Americans had 
already settled in the neighboring territory of Oregon, and at 
tention was being drawn to California, not simply on account of 



12 



its fine climate, but in anticipation of it soon becoming the prop 
erty of our own Government. 

This regiment of New York Volunteers was organized in 1846, 
under the direction of Jonathan D. Stevenson, a gentleman whose 
subsequent administrative ability proved his eminent fitness for 
the position, and upon assembling on Governor's Island, New 
York harbor, he became its colonel. On the 26th day of Sep 
tember, 1846, the regiment sailed for its destination in the ships 
"Thomas H.Perkins," "Susan Drew," and "Loo Choo," fol 
lowed a few months later by the ships " Brutus," " Isabella," and 
" Sweden," with additional men to fill up the command. Few of 
those now residents of the Empire City and State have any re 
collection of the youthful and hardy band that sailed from their 
State to play so important a part in the organization and settle 
ment of a then far-off country. What a contrast between the 
California of 1846 and that of 1882 ! then an almost unknown and 
sparsely settled Mexican territory; now one of the constellation of 
States, teeming with populous cities and enterprising, industrious, 
law-abiding citizens then it required 180 days to make the tedious, 
tiresome voyage between New York and San Francisco, now it is 
performed with ease and pleasure in six days and a few hours. 

The discovery of gold at Sutter's Mill in 1848, caused the 
rapid influx of thousands upon thousands, by sea and land, not 
only from the Atlantic States, but from all parts of the globe, 
thereby adding largely to the population (floating, in a great 
measure) of California. Towns sprang up in every portion of 
the mountains comprising the mining regions, and thus these 
volunteers, destined by the Government to be the nucleus of the 
settlement of this remote land, were almost insensibly absorbed 
by the masses then rapidly pouring into the country. Yet this 
body of early pioneers has contributed some of California's most 
enterprizing and worthy citizens, and during the late civil war 
many of them proved their patriotic devotion to their country, 
filling honorable and distinguished positions as generals, colonels, 
and other officers in the volunteer army. 



In this little volume are recorded the names of all who were 
members of the regiment while on duty in California, March 
6th, 1847, to October 26th, 1848 showing who were living on 
the 1 5th day of April, 1882, also those known to have deceased 
prior to that* date, with other matters of interest pertaining to 
the organization known as the " First Regiment of New York 
Volunteers," commanded by Col. Jonathan D. Stevenson, in the 
service of the United States during the Mexican war. 

In connection with the organization and fitting out of the 
regiment during the summer of 1846, the following editorials 
from the New York Herald, presents the facts and incidents in 
a clear and concise shape, and, from the impartial character of 
that journal, truthfulness may be relied upon. 



From the Herald of August j, 1846. 

Its issue of August 3, 1846, says " We .yesterday paid a 
visit to Governor's Island for the purpose of seeing if the 
good reports given of the body of volunteers there, soon 
to embark for California, were true ; indeed, we were agreeably 
surprised in finding everything so different from what we 
expected in a number of men so lately collected together. 
They are encamped on the south-western side of the island, and 
their new white tents, pitched with military supervision presented 
a fine appearance. There are now on the ground eight com 
panies, comprising about 600 men, which will be increased to the 
full regimental number of 770 by the arrival of two companies 
from the interior of the state. In watching the men as they 
stood in line we could not but notice the excellent material com 
posing them. Some companies, indeed, are like picked men; 
strong, able-bodied mechanics generally, in prime of life, and 
already somewhat schooled in the discipline of the service. The 
officers of the regiment are gentlemen of high abilities, and well 
qualified for their task. Colonel Stevenson's enterprising char 
acter is well known. Lieut. -Col. Henry S. Burton, Major James 
A. Hardie, Captains Shannonj.and Folsom, are all graduates of 
West Point, and have till lately held professorships at that insti 
tution. Lieut. -Col. Burton is a talented and experienced officer, 
and Major Hardie is a gentleman who, though always using 
necessary decision, will endear himself to the soldiers by the 



14 

kindness of his disposition. The Adjutant of the regiment, 
Lieutenant Stevenson, a son of the Colonel, is a graduate of West 
Point, and is every inch a soldier. The uniform of the regi 
ment will soon be completed, designed by Major Hardie, is very 
neat and serviceable; pantaloons of dark, mixed grey, with scar 
let strip or cord up the seam of the leg, blue coats with scarlet 
trimmings, a new style of French cap, very becoming; the first 
dress parade of the regiment will take place next Sunday. One 
company, under command of Captain Seymour G. Steele, is com 
posed entirely of temperance men. If this body of men, under 
such officers, and of such stamina themselves, do not create a 
new state of things in the region to which they go, we are much 
mistaken. Success attend them." 

From the Herald of August 4, 1846. 

" A company from Steuben county, under command of Cap 
tain Shannon, a fine looking body of men, belonging to the regi 
ment of volunteers on Governor's Island, arrived in this city 
yesterday." 

From the Herald of September 6, 1846. 

" THE CALIFORNIA EXPEDITION. ITS OBJECT AND PURPOSE. ' 
The preparations and outlay for this expedition have been 
the cause of much noise, speculation and vituperation among 
certain portions of the community, who have echoed the half- 
fledged opinions of a few presses whose conductors have no souls 
of sympathy with any movement, however advantageous to the 
country at large, unless it yields directly to the glorification of 
their peculiar party. 

" Again and again it is asked, what is the object of this expe 
dition ? and more particularly now, as the war is supposed to 
be virtually at an end, and the country to which it is destined is 
really in the possession of the United States. Briefly as possible 
we will give our ideas of trje objects, intended operations and 
advantages of this expedition. 

" The rich and beautiful region of California will without doubt 
come into formal possession of the United States, without any 
further fighting for it. Far removed as it is from our seat of 
Government, inhabited in a measure by a half-civilized people, 
it will be absolutely necessary, if we intend to hold it, that mili 
tary possession be taken of it, and that a territorial government 
be established there, and what is the class who, under such cir 
cumstances, are best fitted to do this ? Not mere soldiers, whose 
only knowledge is a military one. Not politicians, who can 
theorize most beautifully, but whose schemes burst like gas- 
bubbles when tried by the fire of practice; but the sound, hardy 
mechanics of our country the men whose hands know useful 
labor the artizan, at whose touch the rough metal is moulded 



into implements of use the men who transform the material 
into the necessaries and luxuries of human existence. The hard- 
handed, honest laborer, the farmer, the blacksmith, the tailor, 
the shoemaker, the hatter, the carpenter, the mason; these are 
men under whose auspices a country rich in soil, healthy in cli 
mate, and possessing local advantages of a rare nature, will grow 
up and flourish. Precisely of trys class are the men whom our 
Government are about sending to California. Nearly every man 
in the regiment is a mechanic, and may carry his implements of 
trade with him. Should the regiment be disbanded immedi 
ately upon its arrival, it contains within itself the elements of 
prosperity, wealth and greatness. A great harmony of feeling 
exists between both officers and men, and a fortnight more will 
probably find these pioneers in the cause of the advancement of 
human freedom, civilization and prosperity, on their way to the 
land of their hopes and future prospects. Arrived there, they 
will cause the ' wilderness to bud and blossom as the rose tree,' and 
plant the standard of the American Government and enterprise 
upon the soil of California." 

From the Herald of September 14, 1846. 

4< The troops comprising the expedition for the conquest, 
settlement, or annexation of California, will, in a few days, em 
bark for their destination; and in spite of all the difficulties and 
opposition attending their progress from the commencement, 
they will sail, admirably adapted for the purposes intended by 
the Government to be effected. If their path in a foreign country 
is to be cut by the sword, strong minds guide and strong arms 
carry the weapons with which to overcome all obstacles. If they 
are to settle down quietly in the posssession of the soil, there 
are hands used to toil, and implements of husbandry and me 
chanism are ready to be devoted to the improvement of the 
ground they occupy. In either case, whether their cause is to 
be one of conquest and just retaliation or of peaceful occupa 
tion, the expedition is composed of material well provided with 
men and means, and one that will do credit to the State which 
is honored in the selection of her sons for the first body of troops 
sailing from the United States to a foreign land. 

"Much has been said, and much unjustly, relative to the or 
ganization of the regiment, and many have been the sneering re 
marks thrown out, predicting that a corporal's guard would be 
all remaining, by the time that the day appointed for embarka 
tion came round. The present actual condition and force of the 
regiment is the best answer to all such aspersions. Ten com 
panies, the full complement of the force, show a muster roll of 
over 700 men, being as many as are allowed to enlist ; a band of 
excellent musicians is organized; the ships to convey the troops 
to their destination are chartered, prepared, and ready for sea; 
a powerful armament of cannon, guns, mortars, and, in fact, of 



i6 

every thing necessary for either a regiment of dragoons, artillery, 
or infantry has been furnished; clothes, provisions, and necessary 
equipments of every sort have been provided. The men them 
selves are contented and anxious to start ; the officers generally 
are men of military knowledge and experience some of them, 
and indeed all of the field officers, with the exception of the 
colonel, have held situations a* professors at West Point, which 
is the best evidence of their fitness for the duties assigned them; 
and now that this whole body of American citizens, mechanics, 
and farmers, commanded by able men, are about to go from 
among us, it is wrong that any of the press of the State which 
calls them her own, should endeavor to mar the good results and 
good feeling to be derived from their effects, on account of 
political or personal prejudice against one or more of the 
officers. 

" Col. Stevenson, who commands the expedition, has a most 
admirable opportunity of displaying his perseverance and fitness 
of character to enter upon a bold enterprise, from the commence 
ment of the organization of the regiment up to the present time; 
probably there are but few men in the country who could design 
and carry through a project so complicated, and in as successful 
a manner as he has done. Attacked on every side by political 
enemies, or disappointed for an approach to the rank which he 
holds; retarded by the non-action of the Governor of this State, 
who seems, for some private reasons, to have granted unwillingly 
and but by degrees, the aid which his station enabled him to 
afford; encumbered with the supervision and necessary discipline 
of 700 or 800 men unused to restraint of any kind, he has dis 
played an energy and boldness which qualify him in a super- 
eminent degree for a commander of a body of troops, which de 
parts upon a business requiring the utmost acumen and per 
severance. To Colonel Stevenson, and to his Lieutenant-Colonel, 
Major, and Adjutant, the whole credit is due for carrying to a 
prosperous crisis an expedition fraught with interest to every 
American citizen. 

" We say nothing of the ultimate results to be effected from 
this expedition. The United States Government is fully aware 
of their importance, judging from the liberal manner in which all 
necessary outfits have been granted, and we can but wish them 
that success which seems almost certain to arise from the 
elements composing their power. We have perfect confidence in 
the judgment and skill of the superior officers; and as for the 
men, they are, and all must have, too much at heart the honor 
of their country ever to disgrace her flag. The fifteen or twenty 
of them that took advantage of the baby act and left the regi 
ment, could well be spared their places were filled by better 
men, and at a future day we hope that the expedition which is 
soon to sail, will, by their deeds of honor, acquire a name which 
no one would be unwilling to have bestowed upon himself." 



From the Herald of September 29, 1846. 

REFERRING TO THOSE WHO HAD BEEN LEFT BEHIND BY THE 
SHIPS, the issue of September 29, 1846, says "According 
to notice, a meeting was held yesterday, in the Trophy Room 
connected with the City Armory, of those who were left behind 
attached to the California regiment. Captain Nelson Taylor, 
of Co. E, was confined to his b'ed by sickness. Lieutenant 
Geo. F. Penrose, of Co. A, presided, and Lieutenant Trios. L. 
Vermule acted as secretary. After some remarks from 
the secretary, he read a letter from Colonel Bankhead, who, as 
soon as he heard of the situation of those who were prevented 
sailing, immediately offered to supply them with rations and 
quarters on the Island till he could hear from the Adjutant- 
General at Washington; a letter was also read from the daughter- 
in-law of Secretary (War) Marcy, and wife of the commissary 
of the regiment, containing information of a cheering character. 
The secretary stated that those who wished to follow the for 
tunes of their companions in arms to California would un 
doubtedly have an opportunity of shortly joining them, as a fast 
vessel would undoubtedly be dispatched which would overtake 
the convoy at Rio Janeiro. A series of resolutions were then 
read and passed unanimously. The purport of them declared 
their own regret and distress at being left behind. That they 
wished to join the regiment as soon as possible; that they re 
turned their thanks to Col. Bankhead, and would immediately 
proceed to the Island ; that they had been legally enlisted, and, 
detesting the name of deserter, would serve their country even 
as they had sworn to do. Thereupon the whole body, consist 
ing of two lieutenants, four sergeants, and about thirty privates, 
took up their line of march to the Battery. The whole affair was 
an excellent comment on those who through the columns of the 
press have stated that so many were dissatisfied and would desert 
the first opportunity. These men, one antl all, were anxious by 
any means or in any way to place themselves under the com 
mand of Col. Stevenson, in whom their confidence has never been 
impaired." 



After remaining upon Governor's Island some six weeks, the 
.little band of stragglers embarked on board the ship ' Brutus,' 
Captain Adams, which vessel had been chartered by the Govern 
ment for that purpose, as also to convey a cargo of stores to Cali 
fornia for the use of the command, and on the i3th of November 
sailed from the port of New York for their destination. 



i8 

From the Herald of November 13, 1846. 

" The ship which was to have sailed yesterday for the Pacific 
with Government stores, etc., and having on board those of Col. 
Stevenson's California Regiment who were left behind on the 
departure of the main body in September last will sail this day. 

" We have received the following card, with a request for its 
publication, which we comply with, especially as it evinces a 
proper feeling for a most gallant officer: 

" * SHIP BRUTUS NEW YORK HARBOR, 

" ' November 12, 1846. 

u ' The undersigned, a committee on behalf of the detach 
ment of the California Regiment, who sail this day for their 
destination, (with the approbation of their officer,) would seize 
the only opportunity that occurs of tendering to Col. Bankhead, 
Commanding at Governor's Island, the grateful acknowledge 
ments, for the kind treatment received by them since the de 
parture of the expedition. 

" ' The undersigned on behalf of their comrades, while express 
ing their gratitude, indulge the hope that Col. Bankhead may 
long enjoy health, and the good will of the citizens of New York. 

1 JAMES QUEEN, ist Sergt., Co. F. 
' AB'M VAN RIPER, ist Sergt. Co. -E. 
' J. S. BALDWIN, ist Corp., " I. 
1 JOHN ROSE, " " G. 

1 TYNMAN UPSON, Private, " G. 
' J. E. NUTTMAN, " " B.' 

" This we believe is the conclusion of the after piece, follow 
ing the great drama of the formation and sailing of the California 
Expedition, as far as this port is concerned. When we next 
hear from them, may it be from the soil to which they are des 
tined, and of conduct, whether as citizens or soldiers, creditable 
to the city from which they went forth." 



IN the Spring of 1847, Captain James M. Turner, of Co. B, 
who sailed in the ship " Thomas H. -Perkins," at the time the ex 
pedition took its departure, having left the vessel upon its arrival 
at Rio Janeiro, returned to New York City, and upon the author 
ity of the War Department commenced the enlistment of a de- 
teichment of two hundred men as recruits for the regiment, and 
which men, it was announced, woulcj, proceed overland to Cali 
fornia, but it was subsequently determined that they also should 
proceed to California by the same route as the expedition. The 



19 

detachment was stationed at Fort Hamilton, opposite the Nar 
rows of New York Harbor, and on the i6th day of August, 1847, 
one hundred of the man embarked for Philadelphia, under the 
command of Lieut. Thomas J. Roach, accompanied by Lieut. 
John S. Norris, and upon arrival at Philadelphia, the ship 
" Isabella " (which was ready for sea, and only awaited the 
arrival of the detachment), received the men on board, and on 
the following day sailed down the Delaware on her long voyage. 

The second detatchment of one hundred men, under com 
mand of Lieut. Thomas E. Ketchum, sailed from New York 
some weeks after the departure of the " Isabella," on board the 
ship " Sweden." These two vessels reached California in 
February, 1848. 

This new accession filled up the regiment to nearly 900 men; 
Companies E and G received a portion of the recruits, but the 
greater portion upon their arrival in Alta-California were sent to 
Lower California, and assigned to Companies A, B and D. 

In the month of March, 1847, the transports "Thomas H. 
Perkins," " Susan Drew," and " Loo Choo," arrived at San Fran 
cisco, and the following month the " Brutus " put in an appear 
ance, and in the month of February, 1848, the " Isabella " and 
" Sweden " arrived at Monterey. The average voyage of these 
vessels was 165 days, and with one exception, the vessels 
touched at South American ports, thereby relieving the mono 
tony of the long and tedious voyage. The health of the men re 
mained good on those vessels that visited ports on the eastern 
and western coasts of South America, as they were amply pro 
visioned with fresh supplies of vegetables in each port, and the 
evil effects of the salt provisions furnished at sea was in a meas 
ure counteracted, and even the health of those who were aboard 
the " Brutus," which vessel made no port between New York and 
San Francisco, remained good until within a few weeks of the 
termination of the voyage, 

At the date of the arrival of the regiment the whole of Upper 
California was in the possession of the United States authorities, 



20 



naval and military combined, and among the officers of 
the army were the present General W. T. Sherman, Major- 
General Edw. O. C. Ord, as also the late Major-General 
H. W. Halleck, Lieutenants in the regular service. Upon 
the arrival of the regiment it was assigned by companies 
to various portions of the country for the purpose of 
holding possession and maintaining order under military 
rule. 

In the Spring of 1848 gold was discovered by Marshal, 
at Sutter's Mill, (Coloma), and although the temptation of 
earning hundreds of dollars per day in the mines instead of 
the twenty-three cents received from the Government was 
almost irresistible, still, to the honor of the command, few 
were the number who deserted, preferring an Honorable Dis- 
c/iarge and EMPTY POCKETS to the golden nuggets and a bran Jen 
name. 

The Fall of that year witnessed the disbandment of the or 
ganization, the last companies discharged were A, B and D, at 
Monterey, on the 24th of October, by Captain Henry S. Burton, 
3d U. S. Artillery, (late Lieut. -Col. of the regiment), and Major 
Henry Hill, Paymaster U. S. Army, having liquidated the claims 
of both officers and privates, preparations were immediately in 
augurated for the departure to the mines. Oxen, carts of the 
Mexican pattern, horses, mules, saddles, etc., were in great de 
mand, and all in the market found ready purchasers at liberal 
prices. The distance to the mines at that date (Mokelumne 
Hill) was about 250 miles, and it was necessary to transport 
the provisions required for the winter, as the prospect of 
procuring them at the mines were uncertain, and even if 
they were to be purchased, the amount required to provide 
a person with subsistence until they were enabled to perfect 
their plans for digging would soon deplete their already limited 
purses. 

The writer passed the winter of 1-848-9 on the Mokelumne 
river, about one mile below the hill, and the subjoined were some 



21 



of the prices demanded and paid for clothing, provisions, &c., in 
that locality: 

Flour, per Ib $i oo Blankets, per pair $ 50 oo 

Sugar " 2 oo Flannel shirts 25 oo 

Coffee " 3 oo Common boots, per pair 100 oo 

Pepper in grain per Ib 5 oo " shoes, " 32 oo 

Salt pork " 5 oo Mexican sera pas (shawls) 100 oo 

Salt " i oo 

And a mixture, denominated brandy, whiskey, or gin, of the 
vilest quality, was retailed at $2 per drjnk, or $20 per bottle. 
Canned oysters (one pound), $16. The yield of gold being 
liberal, these prices were cheerfully paid by the dwellers in the 
mountains. 

As incredible as the above prices may appear they are never 
theless strictly true. 

The discovery of gold in California opened up a field of 
labor and profit which amply repaid the volunteers for their 
long separation from friends and home in that then far-off 
distant land, yet 'tis sad to contemplate how few of those ad 
venturous youths and brave pioneers benefited themselves as 
they had the opportunity offered. A few are at this day (1882) 
wealthy, but the majority of the survivors are little more than 
earning a livelihood, and there are, no doubt, among them some 
who are in destitute circumstances, but the greater part of the 
men who were discharged in 1848 have ceased to exist, except in 
the memory of their old comrades and others who in California's 
early days were numbered among her pioneers. 

At the present date the old organization has nearly passed 
from memory except as one of its former members is borne to 
the grave, and then his name is mentioned, and on the morrow 
forgotten, but let us hope that Caifornia's early pioneers, those 
men and women who wended their way over the rugged 
mountains or the trackless ocean ere the alluring temptation 
of gold was presented, may ever live in the history of the Golden 
State. 



22 



(Dtftccrs. 

Surbibor lpril I51fj, ISS2. 



*Col. JONATHAN D. STEVENSON San Francisco. 

[ '. S. Shipping Commissioner at S, F. since iSjs. 



Lieut. Col. HENRY S. BURTON : . At Fort Adams, R. I., April 4th, '69. 

Major General of Vols. late war. 

Major JAMES A. HARDIE . . . . Washington, D. C., Dec, 14th, '76. 

/>V;V. Genera! of I'ols. late war. 



Staff Officers. 

.Surbibors, 3pril I51i), ISS2. 



*Surgeon ALEXANDER PERRY ........ New York City. 

Ass't Surg. ROBERT MURRAY ........ U. S. Army. 

" WILLIAM C. PARKER . . . . Oakland, Cal. 

('apt. WILLIAM G. MARCY, Commissary . . . . ' . . Alameda, Cal. 

Secretary State Constitiitional Convention at Monterey, 1849. 

*Lieut. J. C. BONNYCASTLE, Adjutant . . . . Louisville, Ky. 

Officer of the Regular A rmy from Oct. 1848 to May iSbi. 



Capt. JOSEPH L. FOLSOM, A. Q. M. At San Jose Mission, July 15th, '55. 



Non-QToinmissioucb Staff. 



Sergt. -Major ALEX. C. McDONALD .. Near doverdale, April 5th, '80. 
Q. M. Sergt. STEPHEN HARRIS . . . . Sep. 26th, '46 to Aug, 12th, '47. 

Date and Place unknoivn. 

Q. M. Sergt. GEORGE G. BELT . . . . Aug. 12th, '47 to July 1st, '48. 

Died at Stockton in iSbq. 

Q. M. Sergt. JAMES C. LOW . . . . July 1st, '48 to Oct. 26th, '48. 

Died at San Rafael in 18 - . 



23 

Beg intent a I Sanb. 

(Enknofcm. 



COHN, MORITZ 
DUNITCH, ERNEST F. 
ECKER, JOHN 
ESCHERICK, CARL 
FETZCHOROR, CHRISTIAN 
FAUFTER, JOHANN 
HUCHAS, HEINRICH 
HAUFF, ERNEST 



HEHN, HENRY 
KRAUSS, CHARLES 
KLEINBROTH, JOHN 
MARX, ERNEST 
MOSSIA, ANTONIO 
ROANE, JOHN 
WEHLER, EDWARD 
YOUNG, CHARLES D. 



*Drum Major GEORGE BATCHELOR 

Cliief Musician, JOSEPH VEVIS . . Sept. 26tli, '46 to Dec. 20th, '47. 

FREDERIC GRAMBIS .. Dec. 23d, '47 to Oct. 26th, '48. 

Date and Place of Death, of above three unknown. 

Musican ANTON ROSENTIEL . . At San Francisco, April 4th, '55. 
JOHN WHALEN .. .. At Los Angeles, Dec. 7th, '53. 



Sutlers 1 Department. 

SSurfubor, Spril I5tf), I8S2. 



*J A MES C. L. WADS WORTH, clerk ...... San Francisco. 

2d Alcalde of Stockton, 184$. 



SAMUEL W. HAIGHT, sutler 



Co. "<*," 

Was recruited by Seymour G. Steele, at "Stoneall's Hotel," on 
Fulton Street, near Nassau Street, in the City of New York. 
The first recruits were enrolled on the evening of the 6th of 
July, 1846. Early on the morning of the ist of August, the men 
formed at this rendezvous and took up their line of march for 
the foot of Whitehall Street, en route for Governor's Island. 
The Battery was thronged by thousands of citizens to witness 
the departure of the men, who were to compose the " California 
Expedition " from the city. On the 2d of September the men 
were sworn and mustered into the service of the United *"States. 
On the 23d of September, the Company embarked on board the 
ship " Loo Choo," which sailed for California three days later, 
arriving at San Francisco on the 26th day of March, 1847, six 



2 4 

months to a day from New York. On the 3ist of March the 
Company embarked on board the bark "Moscow," accompanied 
by Companies "B" and " F," and sailed for Santa Barbara, at 
which place they landed on the 8th of April. They encamped 
on the beach for several days, before going to their barracks in 
the town of Santa Barbara. On the 4th of July this Company 
and Company " B " embarked on board the U. S. Storeship 
"Lexington," and sailed for La Paz, Lower California, a port on 
the Gulf of California, at which place the Company landed on 
the 2ist of July, 1847. While in the Lower Country, Companies 
" A " and " B " withstood a siege of some thirty days at La Paz 
by the Mexican Forces doing duty in Lower California, and upon 
the arrival of the ship "Isabella" with Company "D" and 114 
recruits, in March, 1848, the whole command, under Lieutenant- 
Colonel Burton, marched into the interior and dispersed the 
Mexican forces, which outnumbered the Americans five to one. 
On the 3ist day of August, 1848, the Company embarked on 
board the U. S. Ship of the Line, "Ohio," and sailed September 
ist for Monterey, stopping at San Jose, del Cabo, near Cape San 
Lucas for Company " D," and on the i4th of October following- 
arrived in Monterey, Upper California. 

Comrade William H. Rogers of Company "A," under date of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., December 6th, 1881, in writing his experiences 
while in the Army, says : 

" After a pleasant sail down the Coast, in the Storeship 
" Lexington," in the month of July, 1847, we rounded the Needle 
Rocks, off Cape St. Lucas, passed San Jose, and were soon 
coasting up the Gulf of California, and on July 2ist entered the 
Harbor of La Paz, and came to anchor two miles off shore. 
Towards sunset we commenced to land in boats. When within 
three-quarters of a mile of the shore, we took to the water, which 
was about four feet deep, and waded ashore, with our clothes, 
muskets and accoutrements on our shoulders. One of our 
number had his foot badly cut by a pearl shell. After reaching 
the beach we put on our clothes and fell into line. Captain 
Steele inquired for the Quartel, and he either mistook the answer 
or some wag gave him the wrong directions, for in a short time 
we halted in front of the village grave-yard ; but w r e were soon 
righted and about-face for the Quartel, which we reached toward 
twilight ; found it to be a dilapidated old ruin, full of dirt, fleas 
and vermin, but the boys soon scattered around the town, leaving 



25 

only the guard in full possession. Next morning discovered a 
closet full of wooden stocks for the head, arms and legs, with 
iron manacles, chains and hand-cuffs. We soon destroyed these 
relics of barbarism and tyranny by making a good bon-fire of the 
wooden stocks, and destroying the manacles, chains and cuffs." 



(to. "Q!t." 

. Surbtbors, Xlprtl Uttj, 1882. 

*( apt. SKYMOUR G. STEELE San Diego. 

BARTIIROP, EDWARD San Francisco. 

CAHILL, MARTIN Stockton. 

*CLAMP, RICHARD Chinese Canip. 

DENKERS, CHARLES W Sacramento. 

*DEAN, GILBERT E. Fort Lee, N. J. 

EHLERS, AUGUST Los Angeles. 

HOUGHTOX, SHERMAN O. (Sergt.) . . . . . . San Jose. 

K.v-Mayor of San Jose. Ex-Recorder of Santa Clara Co, Ex-Member of Congress. 

HILL, THOMAS J. San Francisco. 

MACDONOUGH, JOSEPH . . San Francisco. 

Capt. in General Meagher's Brigade, late war. 

*MYERS, RUSSELL New York City. 

Major jid Regt. N. 1". I'ols., late ivar. 

MUNSON, LEONARD A Two Rocks, Sonoma Co. 

NOYES, MICHAEL S. Eureka, Nevada. 

O'SI'LLIVAN, JAMES San Francisco. 

E.v-Editor " Herald" Sonoma, Tonlmnne Co. 

POST, FREDERICK L San Francisco. 

Clerk S. F. Post Office, past 2O years. 

*PARVIN, JOHN B Monticello, Minn. 

*PERRY, MOSES W Tucson, Arizona. 

ROGERS, WILLIAM H Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SCOLLAN, JOHN Santa Barbara. 

-S< IIOONMAKER, JACOB J. Vineland, N. J. 

8 ATM) I-; IIS. THEODORE R New York City. 

THOMPSON. JAMES Brooklyn, N. Y. 

THOMAS, JOHN W San Jose. 

WOOLEY, WILLIAM Camp Seco, Calaveras, Co. 

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM II Nyack, N. V. 



to be 3Ltbhi3. 

TAIT, .1 AM KS A Was at Santa Cruz, Cal., 1874. 

FLOOD, JOHN .. .. " San Francisco, " 

WILLARD. ISAAC .. .: .. .." in Mendocino Co., " 

\\KLLKH.KmVARDH at San Francisco, " 



26 



Irtf) mahouts Sntototan. 



Lieut. GEORGE F. PENROSE 
Lieut. CHARLES B. YOUNG 
ALBERGER, JOHN 
BECKER, JOHN 
BONCHALTZ, THEODORE 
BURKE, JAMES 
CHIPMAN, WALTER (Sergt.) 
DOLLMAN, FREDERICK 
FOSTER-, WM. S. 
FENLEY, DANIEL 
HOFFMAN, GEORGE W. 
HATHAWAY, JAMES M. 
IRWIN, EDWARD (Sergt.) 
HAMILTON, JAMES 
LEWIS, JOSEPH B. (Mus.) 
MORSE, HENRY 



MURRAY, EDWARD 
MORTON, FREEMAN 
PEASLEY, -NESMITH H. 
PENNY, MOSES H. 
RYAN, P. H. W. 
SKINNER, JOHN 
SUTPHEN, WILLIAM 
SCHOONMAKER, M. C. (Corpl.) 
SEIDER, GEORGE F. 
THURSBY, LEWIS P. (Corpl.) 
TAIT, WILLIAM G. 
TIPSON, WILLIAM H. 
WILSON, JAMES 
WALSH, JAMES 
WETTERMARK, CHARLES P. 
WEIRGEN, CHRISTIAN 



Lieut. GEORGE F. LEMON, 



^ From wounds received in battle of 
I Crampton Gap, Sept. 14, 1862. 

City Assessor of S. F. in 'JY, Lieut. -Col. J2d Regt. N. Y. Vols. at date of death. 

BROHAN, JOHN At Stockton, - - 1850. 

CURREN, EDWARD At - Cal. - - 1860. 

CARR, STEPHEN At Taylor's Ferry, Stanislaus River, Sept. 1849. 
DARREN, HENRY E. . . Drowned in Sacramento River, Nov. 9, 1849. 

DIXON, JAMES F Drowned in Gold Lake,|January 30, 1880. 

HEYLAND, JOHN At Stockton, Nov. 27, 1852. 

HART, HENRY L At La Paz, L. C., Aug. 20, 1848. 

LUSKEY, JOSEPH Date and place unknown. 

McDONOUGH, NICHOLAS . . . . Accidently killed at La Paz, L. C. 
MURRAY. WALTER . . . . At San Luis Obispo, October 6, 1875 

Ex-Member of the Cal. Legislature, and ivas the District Judge of First Judicial 
District at date of death, 

Date and place unknown. 

At Montery, Nov., 1848. 

La Paz, L. C., August 18, 1848. 
Los Angeles, July 31, 1879. 
Killed by Mokelumne Indians, Dec. 1848. 
Date and place unknown. 
Drowned in San Joaquiii River, 1849. 

San Francisco, , 1849. 

. . Date and place unknown. 



McGILL, PATRICK 
POWELLS, WILLIAM E. 
SWORDS, ALLEN J. . . 
THOMPSON, PETER 
TALMADGE, ABIJAH D. 
VELSOR, STEPHEN . . 
WHITLOCK, MERVIN R. 
WHITLOCK, JACOB H. 
HUXLEY, J. MEAD 



Officer in the Army during the late War, rank unknown. 



TRANSFERRED FROM CO. A. 

ADAMS, JAMES H 

GRAHAM, GEORGE 

MERRILL, JOHN H 

SULLIVAN, CORNELIUS 



To Co- G. 
F. 
K. 



OTo. "8. 11 

This Company was recruited by James M. Turner, at 
Harmony Hall, No. 17 Centre Street, New York. On the 
morning of the ist of .August the men assembled at this place 
and proceeded to the foot of Whitehall Street, en route to 
Governor's Island. When the regiment embarked in September 
for California, this Company was assigned to the ship " Thomas 
H. Perkins," in which ship they were conveyed to California, 
arriving at San Francisco on the 6th of March, 1847. After the 
arrival of the Company in California, its history is coincident 
with that of Company "A," given on another page. 

Upon the departure of Captain Turner for New York, from 
Rio de Janeiro, the command devolved upon Lieutenant Henry 
C. Matsell, which he retained until the discharge of the Company 
at Monterey, on the 24th of October, 1848. 

Whije the Company was stationed at La Paz, Lieutenant 
Thomas E. Ketchum (who came out in command of the recruits 
on the "Sweden"), reported for duty, and a part of the recruits 
by the "Isabella" were assigned to this Company to fill up its 
ranks. Lieutenant Ketchum and the recruits arrived at La Paz 
on the 1 5th of March, 1848, by the ship " Isabella." 



OTo. "33." 

Surbibors, Xlpril Uti), 1882, 
*Lieut. THOMAS E. KETCHUM . . . . Stockton. 

Captain in the jd Regiment California I'olunteers, late war, noiv Brig.-Gencral 
National Guard, State of California. 

AMES, JOSIAH P. .. .. Half Moon Bay, San Mateo Co. 

Ex-Member of Californian Legislature ', now M'ardcr of the Cat. State Prison. 

BADER, CHRISTOPHER . . . . . . . . Cherokee Flat, Butte Co. 

*CATTS, SAMUEL A Stockton. 

< ' I ' N XINGHAM, ALEXANDER S Fresno County. 

DRYER, JOHN . . Santa Cruz, Cal. 

*FARLEY, GEORGE The Dalles, Oregon. 

FARLEY, THOMAS P. Portland, Oregon. 

GALLAGHER, JOHN St. Helena, Cal. 

GREEN, ALFRED A. . . .... San Francisco. 

Ex-Member Californian Legislature, now Attorney-at-Lmv at S. F. 

*HEINRICH, CHARLES ' . ... ... Sacramento. 

Merchant fast 25 years at Sacramento. 

*HORNDELL, JOSEPH St. Louis, Mo. 

LYNCH, PATRICK . . San Francisco. 



28 



MOORE, ANDREW J. . . Philadelphia, Pa. 

Member of the jsnd Regiment, Penn. JW.y., late war. 

OSTWALDT, AUGUST Sacramento. 

*PEARSALL, SAMUEL W Mokelumne Hill. 

*THURSTON, CHARLES H . . ,-. Marysville. 

*McPHERSON, CHARLES J. (Mus.) , New York City. 

*NUTTMAN, JAMES E .. .. "... New York City. 

Ex-chief Engineer of Fire Dep <.rtment at Stockton. 

,, ,, ,, San Francisco. 



Iff)t readouts Slnknofon. 



Lieut. HENRY C. MATSELL 
ADAMS, WASHINGTON 
BOULANGEN, FRANCIS 
BRADY, JOHN R. 
BRIGHAM, E. R. 
BALDWIN, JAMES H. 
BLECKSMITH, LEOPOLD 
CASEY, NEIL 
COFFIN, WILLIAM 
CARTER, GEORGE 
CONNELLY, WILLIAM 
FITCH, WORTHINGTON L. 
GUILD, H. M. (Corpl.) 
-HELMSTADLER, JAMES 
IHRIE, GEORGE 
LUDLOFF, CHARLES 
LAIDLAW, GEORGE 
MASON, JOHN 
McAULLY, ALEXANDER 



McGUIRE, JOHN 

MOUNICH, WILLIAM 

PECK, CHAUNCEY L. (Corpl.) 

PARSONS, ALONZO P. 

PAYSON, SAMUEL 

RICHARDSON, CHARLES (Sergt.) 

RITER, HENRY 

RANDALL, CHARLES G. 

RYAN, EDWARD 

STARK, HENRY (Corpl.) 

SMITH, LEWIS 

SOMERS, FREDERICK 

STONE, HEBER 

ST. JOHN, AUGUSTUS A. 

TURNER, LOAMMI 

TINSON, JOHN 

WEISS, WILLIAM (Corpl.) 

WALL, RICHARD 



Lieut, E. GOULD BUFFUM . . . . at Paris, France, Dec. 24, 1867 

Journalist and author; Paris correspondent of the Neiv York Herald at date of death. 

CARNES, THOMAS 
CLARK, DANIEL P ..... 
CONNELLY, MICHAEL 
CLIFFORD, CORNELIUS 
DENNISTON, JAMES G. (Sergt.) 



Drowned in Stockton Slough, 1851. 
at San Diego, Sept. 24, 1879. 
Date and place unknown. 

. at San Juan Mission, , 185 . 

at San Francisco, June 17, 1869. 



Ex-Member Calif or nian Legislature. 

DRENNER, JAMES ...... Toulimme Co., August , 1871. 

FARLEY, JOHN G ......... San Francisco, -- , 1849. 

FARLEY JOHN (Son of John G.) . . Portland, Oregon, -- , 187. 
HIPWOOD, THOMAS killed in assault at San Antonio, L. C. , March 16, 1848. 
HARPER, THOMAS W. . . Santa Barbara, June 28, 1856. 



2 9 



LAWSON, JOHN 
McGHEE, JOHN 
MAXWELL, WILLIAM H. 
MELVIN, JAMES W. 
MITCHELL, WILLIAM . . 
MURPHY, JOHN 
OGDEN, BENJAMIN . . 

PECK, CHARLES L 

PIERCE, .CHARLES 

M'OTT, CHARLES <T. (Sergt.) 



. . Monterey, , 1849. 

San Francisco, Feb. 23, 1861. 

New York City, Oct. 26, 1876. 

San Francisco, May 18, 1874. 

Australia, N.S.W., . 

Stockton, , 185 . 

at New York, 18 . 

. . Date and place unknown. 

Date and place unknown. 

. . Date and place unknown. 



Ex-Treasurer of San Francisco County. 



STAYTON, JAMES (Sergt.) 
SPATZ, CONRAD (Fifer) ". . 
VAN BUSSOI, J. V. . . 
WHITEHOUSE, BENJAMIN 
WHITE, CHRISTOPHER S. 
WEEKS, ELBERT 



near Calaveras River, Jan. 22, 1852. 

. . Killed at La Paz, Nov. 16, 1847. 

Date and place unknown. 

Stockton, , 185. 

Date and place unknown. 
. . Date and place unknown. 



ransftrrcb from (Do. 13. 



Bl'RCiESS. EDWARD 
CAMPBELL, PETER 
CLOUSSEN, HENRY 
LANKOW, EDWARD 
SMITH, JAMES 
STOLTZE, ADOLPH 
TOYE, H. H. F. 
WILT, JOHN (Sergt.) 
YEAVIS, JOSE 



to Co. G. 
" H. 
" O. 

Regimental Band. 

to Co. F. 

.. " F. 

" G. 

" F. 

" E. 



0. M ." 

This Company was enlisted by John E. Brackett in the City 
of New York, and conveyed to California in the ship " Loo 
Choo," arriving at San Francisco on the 26th of March, 1847, 
and took post at Sonoma in the early part of April, at which 
place it remained until May, 1848, when the Company was 
ordered to San Jose near Cape San Lucas, Lower California, and 
had proceeded as far as Monterey, when the order was counter 
manded, and the command returned to Sonoma. On the 5th of 
August, 1848, the Company proceeded to the Presedio, San 
Francisco, exchanging posts with Company " H," stationed at 
that point. During the summer and Fall of 1847, a detatchment 
of 35 men from this Company was stationed at Fort Sacramento 
(Sutter's Fort) for five months. 



3 

An .old resident of Sonoma, writing to the "Californian," 
at San Francisco at that time the only newspaper published in 
California under date of August 5th, 1848, among other sub 
jects, pays the following compliment to this command : 

" The military company under command of Captain J. E. 
Brackett are to-day exchanging posts with Company "H," under 
command of Captain Frisbie, both of the New York Volunteers. 
Company " C " has been stationed with us more than a year, and 
much praise is due its members, not only for the military and 
soldier-like manner in 'which they have acquited themselves as a 
corps, but for their gentlemanly and orderly deportment, individ 
ually and collectively. We regret to part with them, and cannot 
let them go without expressing a hope that, when peace shall 
have been declared, their regiment disbanded, and their country 
no longer needs their services, they may have fallen sufficiently 
in love with our healthy climate and our beautiful valley to come 
back and settle." 



0. "or." 

, 0pril 1st, 1882. 



AURWELLER, JOHN .......... San Francisco. 

*COX, ALEXANDER J ....... . . . . Mendocino City. Cal. 

Journalist; Founder of the Sonoma Bulletin in 1852. 

DOTTER, WILLIAM C. . ......... San Francisco. 

Ex-Member Californian Legislature. 

DOW, JOSEPH G. . . .-.'' ........ Mendocino. 

HUEFNER, WILLIAM .......... .San Francisco. 

Marshal, Society of California Pioneers, at S. F. 

KAMP, HUROLD ............ . . Sonoma. 

NORRIS, DAVID (Corpl.) ...... Centreville, Alameda Co. 

RUSS, ADOLPH G ............. San Francisco. 

STORY, GEORGE . ...... on Russian River, near Healdsburg. 

WASHBURN, LYSANDER E ..... ...... San Francisco. 

Captain, 3d Regiment, Cal. Vols,, late war, 



to tt HLibhuj. 

Lieut. THERON R., PER LEE . . . . was in New York City in 1880. 
AMES, THADDEUS M. was M.D. at Indian Reservation, Men. Co., in 1860. 
JONES, WILLIAM . . . . . . was in Sonoma Co. in 1874. 



BARRET, FRANCIS H. 
BERTRAX1), EMILE 
BALLARI), JOHN 
CROSBY, EDMUND P. (Sergt.) 
CAMERON, JOHN 

Ex-Mayo r of Sonoma. 

CONRAD, HENRY 
DELEHAYE, CHARLES 
DE ST. QUINTAIN, JOSEPH 
DONEGAN, JOHN 
DOUGHERTY, JAMES 
ELB, FREDERICK 
GLOSS, JOHN 
HIGGINS, SILAS G. 
HOW, OLIVER H. 
JOHNSON, WILLIAM (Sergt.) 
KIESLER, LAFAYETTE 
KLENGEL, FRANCIS 
KKXTZBURY, ADOLPHUS 



KROHN, JOHN M . 
KAPPIS, GEORGE 
LYNCH, FERDINAND 
MINARD, THOMAS A. 
MILLER, FRANCIS 
NAGLE, FERDINAND 
PETERSON, FREDERICK 
PRENTICE, CHARLES 
RUB, GEORGE 
ROEDER, LOUIS 
SCOTT, WILLIAM 
SMITH, GERARD D. 
STRANGE, JOHN 
TIMEANS, CHARLES (Mus.) 
WEAVER, WILLIAM J. 
WILDER, ANTHONY 
WILLHART, LOUIS 
ZETSCHSKY, CHARLES 



Capt. JOHN E. BRACKETT 



Date and place unknown. 



Ex-Member Californian Legislature 1850; Ex-Major-Gfnl. Cal. State Militia. 

THO\TAi T POAPTT f Drowned near Young's Ferry, on Klamatli 
MAS J. ROACH, 



Ex-Deputy Collector Port of San Francisco ; County Judge elect of Klamath Co. 

at time of death. 

Lieut. CHARLES C. ANDERSON . . at San Francisco, Sept. 13, 1847. 



CUSHING, BELA (Carpi.) . 
CONWAY, JOHN P. 
FOSTER, BENJAMIN F. 
GREEN, WILLIAM G. . . 
KONIG, W.LLIAM .. 
KINNS, ALEXANDER . : 
LAYDEN, WILLIAM 

MCCARTY, DAVID c. 
MCCARTY, EDWARD 

RAND, JOSHUA .. 
RICHARDSON, ARTEMUS.. 
RUMSCHOTTEL, RICHARD 
RUSS, J. C. CHRISTIAN . . 



Sonoma, Jan. 13, 1848. 

San Francisco, , 18 . 

Portsmouth, N.H., July 21, 1865. 

San Rafael, Aug. 1, 1871. 

Drowned in Sacramento River, June 11, 1847. 

. . Found dead near Sonoma, Dec. 19, 1847. 

Date and place unknown. 

San Francisco, Sept. 9, 1868. 

Santa Barbara, April 5, 1852. 

Date and place unknown. 

Somona, Cal., July 12, 1854. 

Drowned at Stockton, July 10, 1874. 

San Francisco, June 4, 1857. 



First Jeweler and Watchmaker established at S. F. 



en Voyage. 



Lieut. WILLIAM R, TREMMELS 



off Cape Horn, - , 1846. 



32 

QTransfcrrtii from (o. d*. 

Lieut. GEORGE D. BREWERTON .......... 

V ROBINSON, GEORGE (Sergt.) .......... " ti. 

MORRISON, RODERICK M ............. " K. 

WEHLER, EDWARD .......... to Regimental Band. 

V WADDELL, ARCHIBALD . . . . ' ........ to Co. E. 

^ YOUNG, CHARLES D ........... to Regimental Band. 



This Company was enlicted at La Fayette Hall, Broadway, 
opposite Nibblo's Garden, New York City, in the summer of 
1846. Many of its members came from Philadelphia, Captain 
Henry M. Naglee himself being a Pennsylvania!!. Upon the 
embarkation of the regiment for California, the Company was 
assigned to the ship "Susan Drew," which reached San Francisco 
March ipth, 1847. On the ist of April the Company embarked 
on board the U. S. Storeship "Lexington," and on the 30! sailed 
for Monterey, reaching that port on the 4th. While stationed at 
Monterey, portions of the Company were mounted and sent upon 
several expeditions in quest of Indian horse-thieves in the San 
Joaquin Valley and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. These men tra 
veled many days and encamped at riights upon the same ground in 
which were afterwards found such rich gold deposits. On the 5th 
of March, 1848, the Company sailed in the ship "Isabella" for La 
Paz, Lower California, arriving there on the 226. of the same 
month. At La Paz the Company was filled up to 100 men, from 
recruits which had recently arrived by the ships " Isabella " and 
"Sweden." One week after their arrival at La Paz, Lieut. -Col. 
Burton, with Companies A,- B and D, made a march into the 
interior, had an engagement with the Mexican Forces at Todas 
Santos, completely dispersing the enemy and driving them from 
the peninsula. After an absence of two weeks the command re 
turned to La Paz, and, on the i5th of April, Co. D embarked on 
board the U. IS. Storeship "Southampton" for San Jose del Cabo, 
and within three days relieved the Naval Forces stationed at that 
town, which they continued to. garrison until the 6th of Sept., 
1848, upon which date the Company hauled down the stars and 
stripes and evacuated Mexican soil. The Company embarked 
on the U. S. Ship of the Line "Ohio," which conveyed them to 
Monterey, Upper California, where they were discharged. This 
Company was without doubt the last command of American troops 
to leave the soil of Mexico after the close of the Mexican War. 



33 
010. "El." 

Surbibors, 3pril I5ti), 1882. 
Capt. HENRY M. NAGLEE San Jose. 

Krig.-General of I'ols. late ivar. 

*( 'HANDLER, JOHN A. Boston, Mass. 

*C<)RGAN, GEORGE A Chicago, 111. 

I'lCi'-f'rcs. .Iss'fi. I'ets. of the Mex. War, Chicago. 

*CLARK, FRANCIS D. New York City. 

Justice of the Peace San Joaquin County 1852,3 and 4: Major and Military Secretary, 
Department of North Carolina, under Plan, Edivard Stanly, late ivar. 

*DEAN, GEORGE C Visalia. 

GKAY. JAMKSA Salinas City. 

Ex-Mentlier of Calif ornia Legislature. 

*IIARR(.)N, JAMESM Sentinel, Fresno Co, 

1 1 A V E Y . J ( ) 1 1 N . . West Point, Calaveras Co. 

*JOHNSON, WILLIAM S Salinas City.. 

E.f-County Recorder, Ex-County Clerk and Ex-County Treasurer of Monterey Co.^ 
now cashier Salinas City Bank. 

*LIPP, CARL Valleja. 

MOORE. ANDRKNV Gilroy. 

MYERS, GEORGE Mount Eden, Alameda Co. 

*NORRIS, JACOB W . . Newark, N. J. 

NOIU Sergeant of Police, Neivark, N. J. 

PHILLIPS, JOHN B San Francisco. 

REAUSSEAU, CHARLES San Francisco. 

*ROBINS()N, WILLIAM D. Monterey. 

*SIMS, JOSEPH Sacramento. 

TOMBS, GEORGE VV Modesto. 

Ex-Treasurer of Stanislaus Co. 

WOODSIDE, PRESTON K Tucson, Arizona. 

Ex-Clerk Supreme Court , State of California. 

*\VOLFE, JOHN . . New York City. 

YOUNG, ALPHIAS . . San Francisco. 



to it 

HILL, JOHN E. ... was at Pendleton, Umatilla Co., Oregon, in 1878. 
Bl'DD, CHARLES K. Sonoma County in 1808. 



SEnknofon. 

BOSTWICK, JAMES C. 
BOCHON, PROCOPI 
CLAUSEN, WILLIAM (Mus.) 
CASTON, GEORGE R. 
COHN, PHILIP 
DELICK, JOHN 
DARRAH, DECATUR 



ATKINSON, CHARLES A. 

AMES, EDWARD T. 

ATHERTON, (iEORGE D. 

BFCKBEE, FLAVIUS (Corpl.) 

BARTELS, LEWIS 

BOND, WILLIAM 

BAR( J KM A N , AUGUSTUS 

3 



34 



DOOLAN, JOHN 
ELLIS, THOMAS W. 
ENNIS, JOHN 
FORBES, HECTOR M. 
FERMOR, EDWARD 
GRAY, ALONZO 
HETHERINGTON, WILLIAM E. 
HAYDEN, GEORGE W. 
HEYDENRICH, WILLIAM 
HARRINGTON, JOHN 
HAAG, FREDERICK 
HACKETT, PATRICK 
HUGHES, JOHN 
HAGEMAN, CHARLES K. 
JENKINS, WILLIAM K. 
JAMES, ALDEN W. 
KUTCHBACK, CHARLES 
KEAPNELL, FREDERICK 
KENNEDY, EDWARD P. 
3L.OCKWOOD, ISAAC 
LEICK, CHARLES 
MARKET, AUGUSTINE 
McCARRAN, JOSEPH 
MULHOLLAND, DOMINEC 
jMcCLUSKY, PHILIP 
MILLER, HENRY 
McINTYRE, TERANCE 
MAGER, ADAM 



MUNROE, JOHN 
MORIN, JOHN L. 
MILLER, JOHN 
MOFFITT, W r ILLIAM B. 
NEWITT, SAMUEL 
NEWMAN, JAMES 
NEIMAN, HENDRICK 
OGLE, CHARLES A. 
PATTERSON, JOHN A. 
POINEER, JACOB A. 
ROBINSON, WILLIAM 
RILEY, JAMES 
ROBB, JAMES B. 
SANFORD, SAMUEL 
SEARLES, GEORGE 
SCOTT, ANDREW 
SINCLAIR, ARCHIBALD 
SHOOTER, CHARLES 
SCHRAELOR, GEORGE 
SWEET, CHARLES C. 
SOHNS, JOHN 
TURNER, DAVID 
VAN AUKEN, PHILANDER 
WILSON, HENRY J. (Sergt.) 
WILSON, JOHN 
WALZ, GEORGE 
WARRINGTON, JOHN 



Lieut. GEORGE A. PENDLETON . . San Diego, March 3, 1871. 

County Clerk of San Diego Co. at date of death. 

Lieut. HIRAM W. THEALL . . . . Hamilton, White Pine, Nevada. 

Lieut. JOSEPH C. MOREHEAD . . . . Date and place unknown 

ASHTON, GEORGE HENRY j ^^\W^ . * ^ ^ J aqUin 
ANDERSON, FRANCIS P San Francisco, Oct. 5, 1881. 



BOWERS, JAMES H. 
CLAPP, CHARLES D. 
CLARK, FRANCIS C. 
EDWARDS, JOHN S. 
FRIUND, HENRY J. 
HART, JOHN 
HARLEY, HENRY 
HILTON, BENJAMIN 
IVEN, ALFRED . . 
JUDSON, HENRY . 



Stockton, Cal., , 185. 

Sydney, N.S.W., ,185. 

Camp on Merced River, 1853. 
Drowned in San Joaquin River, April 4, 1854. 

Date and place unknown. 

Date and place unknown. 

near Sacramento, , 187 . 

Monterey, Sept. 23, 1847. 

Acapulco, Mexico, ,1851. 

. . Mokelumne Hill, , 1849. 



35 

KEHOE, JOSEPH H Monterey, Oct. 18, 1848. 

LYONS, AARON (Sergt.) Monterey, Oct. 2, 1865. 

E-r-Sher iff of Monterey Co. 

L A S K V. V . A 1 ,E X A N HER B. . . . . Killed by Indians, , 1848. 

McKKK, JAMKS M Monterey, Dec. 21, 1847. 

MOORE, JOHN \V Killed by Indians, Mariposa, 1851. 

Mo RAX, JOHN H San Francisco, Feb. 17, 1871. 

M( CLASKY, WILLIAM J San Francisco, Oct. 24, 1866. 

MOT'SER, JOHN . . Drowned in San Joaquin River, June 3, 1847. 

PURPY. SA.MTKL L.. San Jose, L. C., June 11, 1848. 

ROACH, WILLIAM (Sergt.) Monterey Co., Sept. 3, 1866. 

Ex-Sh eriff of Monterey Co. 

RYAN, WILLIAM REDMOND . . . . . . . New Orleans, , 1852. 

Author of " Personal Recollections in Upper and Lower California" pitblished 
in London, 1852. 

SI REY, JAMES Date and place unknown. 

STCKET, LEON San Francisco, Aug. 29, 1871. 

T1LEE, DANIEL E. . New York, , 187. 

WHEELER, \VILLIAM H. H San Jose, L. C., Aug. 12, 1848. 

(Transferred from (o. ID. 

McDONALI), ALEXANDER C Promoted to Sergeant-Major. 

GRAY, ALONZO to Co. E. 

GLTBAL, EUGENE .. .. " L 

S KEMPT, GEORGE W .. .. "I. 

/ MITCHELL, WILLIAM " B. 

RUSSELL, WILLIAM .... " G. 

MASSE, ANTONIO to Regimental Band. 



010. "." 

This Company was recruited by Nelson Taylor, Thomas H. 
Ferris and William E. Cutrell, who were upon its organization 
elected, and subsequently commissioned, respectively, its captain 
and first and secgnd lieutenants. Ferris, before the regiment 
left New York, resigned, and Edward Williams was commissioned 
in his stead. Thomas L. Vermule was also commissioned an 
additional second lieutenant. 

The men who formed this Company were principally from the 
East side of New York City, while many came from the Ninth 
Ward on the West side, headed by Sergeants Van Riper and 
O'Neil. 

On the ist of July, 1846, recruiting for the Company com 
menced at the old Seventh Ward Democratic Head-quarters, 
then kept by Dafiiel Hughes in Madison Street. Another office 



36 

was also opened for a few days at the corner of Fulton and 
Nassau Streets. On the ist day of August the Company was 
marched to the regimental rendezvous on Governor's Island, in 
New York Harbor, and a few days subsequently were mustered 
into the service by Colonel Bankhead. 

Upon the embarkation of the regiment in September it was 
found necessary to divide one of the Companies into three 
sections, there being ten companies in the regiment and only 
three transports, the honor therefore of being represented on 
each of the ships fell to this Company. Captain Taylor was 
lying sick at his home at the time of the embarkation of the 
regiment ; he had, however, arranged to be carried on board the 
ship "Thomas H. Perkins," but owing to the negligence of the 
officer having the matter in charge, he failed to be notified, and 
the fleet sailed, leaving him in New York. Captain Taylor was 
subsequently assigned to the command of about fifty officers and 
privates who had been left behind, and sailed for California 
in the transport " Brutus," arriving at San Francisco one month 
later than the regiment. 

This Company also embarked on board the U. S. Storeship 
"Lexington," and arrived at Monterey, April 4th, 1847, at which 
place they were stationed until the 5th of May, when they again 
sailed in the "Lexington" for San Pedro, and reached Los 
Angeles on the 9th, which post was made the Head-quarters of 
the regiment. The Company remained at Los Angeles until the 
1 8th of September, 1848, when it was mustered out of the ser 
vice. The good health of the Company during its whole term 
of service was remarkable not a member was lost by sickness 
and but two from injuries. 

Colonel Stevenson compliments thus the soldiers of Cos. E 
and G. He says, "the two companies of Los Angeles vrere noted 
for their orderly and soldierly bearing, and for their prompt and 
faithful discharge of then* military duties." 

OIo. "<E." 

Surbtbors, Bprtl. 15ti), 1882. 
*Capt. NELSON TAYLOR . South Norwalk, Conn. 

Ex-Member California Legislature; President of the First Board of Trustees, 

State Insane Asylum, Stockton Cat.; Ex-Sheriff of San Joaquin Co.; 

Brig.-GenL of Vols. late ivar. 

Lieut. EDWARD WILLIAMS Oakland. 

BOYERS, WILLIAM (Corpl.) . . . . ..... San Francisco. 

BULLOCK, EZEKIAL .. .. .. San Francisco. 



37 



BRIGGS, CASTOR 
*BARTLETT, JOHN A. .. 
*C AN FIELD, GEORGE VV. 
GRAFF, GEORGE J. 
*JOHNSON, ISAAC C. . . 
^LEONARD, GEORGE W. M. 
*0'NEIL, JOHN M. (Sergt.) . 



. . San Francisco. 

( 'ambridgeport, Mass. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

San Francisco. 

.. . Astdria, Oregon. 

New York City. 

San Francisco. 



Major 2nd Cal. Cavalry late war; noiv Officer of the Customs, S. 



* WELSH, JOHN H.' 
WOHLGEMOUTH, HENRY J. 



New York City. 
San Francisco. 



.Supposed to IDE libtncj. 



LO \V E R Y , A N T HON Y W. 
SNYDER, ELIJAH 
SOUERVOIT, ALEXANDER 



ACKLEY, HENRY (Corpl.) 
BURTON, JAMES C. (Mus.) 
BLAIR, CHARLES D. 
BAXTER, WILLIAM 
BRUSLE, WASHINGTON 
BROWN, CHARLES 
BOG ART, HENRY 
BUCKLE, ROBERT 
BALL, FRANKLIN 
BARRY, BENJAMIM 
BALDWIN, TIMOTHY 
CALDER, LAWSON M. (Corpl,) 
CAMPBELL, JAMES T. 
CLARK, GEORGE 
CHICHESTER, HENRY T. 
DEAS, JAMES 
DRIEHER, JACOB 
FORBES, ELI B. 
FOLEY, ALFRED 
GOLDEN, EDWARD 
IIAMLEN. MORTIMER J. 
HENRY, JAMES 
HUTCHEON, WALTER 
HEARN, THOMAS 
HITCHCOCK, JOHN C. 
H! MPIIREY, BENJAMIN F. 
HALL, JOHN 

JAMIESON, GEORGE WILLIAM 
KINTRING, CHARLES M. 
K1ERNAN, JOHN B. 

'KENNERSLY, A. J. 

LAMBERT, JOHN A. 
LEG A RE, BURNETT 



was at San Francisco in 1878. 

Trenton, N. J., in 1875. 

Los Angeles in 1877. 

(JHnknoton. 
LINTON, JAMES 
McPHERSON, GEORGE (Mus.) 
MORTON, HENRY S. (Sergt.) 
McMANUS, JAMES (Sergt.) 
McGILL, JAMES 
MITCHELL, WILLIAM H. 
MILLIKEN, JOHN 
MORRISON, LUDLAM * 
MOORE, JOHN H. 
MURPHY, THOMAS 
McGRANAGHAN, WILLIAM G. 
OWENS, ALEXANDER 
OLPSTAY, JACOB 
PERKINS, CHARLES 
PARKER, EDWARD 
PLUNKETT, JAMES 
PLUMMER, WILLIAM 
RICHARDS, JAMES 
RAMSEY, JOHN W. 
ROBERTS, SAMUEL 
SMITH, JOHN M. 
SWARTS, JOHN S. 
SNITTER, LEWIS 
STACK, GARRETT 
VAN RIPER, ABRAHAM (Sergt.) 
VORHEES, JOHN 
VINSON, WILLIAM 
WINNIE, WILLIAM 
WHITE, MOSES 
WYLIE, JOHN 
WADDELL, ARCHIBALD 
WEIFENBACK, PHILIP 
YEAMANS, EDWARD 



38 



Lieut, WILLIAM E. CUTRELL . . . . San Francisco, May 28, 1868. 
Lieut, THOMAS L. VERMULE ...... San Jose, -- , 18. 

M fin her (>/ 'the State Constitutional Convention at Monterey in 1849; Ex-Member 
of the California Legislature. 

BRUSLE, JACKSON ...... Contra Costa Co., Feb. 14, 1854. 

BLAIR, NICHOLAS ......... Los Angeles, Sept. 26, 185,5. 

BARTLETT, CHARLES H ..... San Francisco, May 15, 1881. 

BROCKEE, JOSEPH . . Drowned in Stanislaus River, March, 1849. 
DEY, NATHAN B ......... Los Angeles, July 7, 1848. 

EARLE, PETER .......... Sacramento, Jan. 12, 1871. 

FORD, PATRICK . . . . Killed by Rogue River Indians, -- , 1866. 

LEG ARE. WILLIAM H ...... ! . . Los Angeles, Dec. 9, 1847. 

MARK, LOUIS .......... Date and place unknown. 

wc^rr A TV- rpTT^Tv/r \ a \ Killed by Steamboat Explosion on the San Joaquin 
8MAS-J River ; 0ct 19> 1853< 

MEEHAN, DENNIS ...... Killed at Stockton, Fall of 1849. 

PARKER, LEWIS . ......... Date and place unknown. 

TAYLOR, JOHN .......... New York, April 28, 1879. 

THAFFER, ANDREW ... . . . . San Francisco, May 3, 1879. 

VAN PELT, JACOB . . . . . . San Francisco, Nov. 15, 1849. 

(KransfmrlJ from (o. B- 

GILLINGftAM, HENRY . . " ....... . . . to Co. I. 

McKAY, JOHN H. . ............. " K. 

WHALEN, JOHN ........ to Regimental Band. 



OT0. "f." 

At the date of the embarkation of the regiment at New York, 
this Company was assigned to the ship " Thomas H. Perkins," 
and reached San Francisco on the 6th of March, 1847. On the 
8th of the following month the Company reached Santa Barbara 
(see Co. A), at which place it did garrison duty until their 
discharge from the service on the 8th of September,. 1848. 

0. ^-f." 

Surbibors, .Jlpril lotf), 1882. 
*Capt. FRANCIS J. LIPPITT Washington, D.C. 

Member of the State Constitutional Convention at Monterey, 1849 ; elected Colonel 
ist Reg't California Volunteers, June 27, i8bt. 

*Lieut, HENRY STORROW CARNES San Buenaventura. 

Ex-District Judge 2d Jud. District, California; Ex-Member Legislature, Cat.; 
Postmaster at Santa Barbara, 1870 to 1874. 

*ENGELBERG, AUGUST E San Francisco. 

FLYING, ANDREW . . Santa Barbara. 



39 



*LYXCH, JAMES 
MILLHAUSE, GUSTAVE 

Rrss, AUGUST 

*RUSS, CHARLES C. E. . 
SCIILOTTIIOUER, CARL 
SESSER, PETER . . 
*WHITAKER. AMISON 



Jolon, Monterey C 1 o. 

Santa Barbara. 

San Francisco. 

San Francisco. 

Rough and Ready. 

. . San Francisco. 

Sacramento. 



LOPEZ, THEODORE 
MILFORD, EDMUND N. 
WILLIS, OTTIS W. 



to fit HLibing. 



was at Tuolumne Co. in 1874. 

Bodie, Mono CQ., in 1880. 

San Andreas in 1874. 



Lieut. WILLIAM H. WEIRICK 
CARPEXTER, ( 1 HARLES R. 
COOPER, JAMES F. 
COE, JOHX J. 
DOULEVY, JAMES 
EVANS, RANDOLPH 
FLEETWOOD, ROBERT 
FIELD, JOHN 
FIELD DANIEL 
FULLER, WILLIAM M. 
GALUSHA, ELON A. 
GRAHAM, GEORGE 
HUGHES, WILLIAM (Corpl.) 
JORDAN, PHILIP 
KING, WILLIAM 
KONTZ, JOHN G. 
LEE, JOHX C. 
LEFORT, GEORGE 
MULVEY, JAMES (Sergt.) 
McSPADDEN, JAMES 



MCMILLAN, CHARLES 

McCRACKEX, WILLIAM R. 
McLEOD, FRAXCIS J. 
MASOX, ALFRED 
POWER, EDWARD (Corpl.) 
PULIS, JOHN C. (Sergt.) 
POWER, JOHN A. 
RIGBY, GEORGE F. (Corpl.) 
SMITH, THEODORE 
SARGENT, JAMES K. 
SHURTS, WATSON 
SMITH, JAMES G. 
SMITH, HENRY J. 
STEPHENS, PETER 
STOLZE, ADOLPHUS 
TROUTMAN, JAMES B. 
TROUTMAN, JOHN (Drummer) 
VIPAL, JOHN A. 
WINDMEYER, RICHARD 



Lieut. JOHN M. HUDDART. . 
BATHGATE, GEORGE . . 
I )ELA XEY, RICHARD E. . , 
G A NXOX, THOMAS 
GOUMLY. MARTIN F. 
HEFFERXAN, CHARLES 
1 1 ASK ELL, JOHN W. 
LEE, CORNELIUS R. V. 

LEWIS, JOI IX 

OAKLEY, ROBERT 



at Sandwich Islands, , 185 . 

Date and place unknown. 

at San Francisco, Sept. 20, 1876. 

at Santa Barbara, Dec. 30, 1855. 

Killed by Steam Explosion, April 15, 1854. 

at San Francisco, , 18 . 

at Santa Barbara, April 13, 1878. 

at Santa Barbara, Jan. 11,1 863. 

at Santa Barbara, April 27, 1 848. 

at Santa Barbara, Jan. 1, 1848. 



ROANE, ARCHIBALD . . at Georgetown, I). C., Sept! 3, 1879. 

STOCKTON, WILLIAM B Date and place unknown. 

STOTHERS, JOHN E Oakland, 4-, 187. 

SCHRIVES, DANIEL B. Date and place unknown. 

TINDALL/WILLIAM at San Francisco, , 18. 

WILT, JOHN .. .. .. .. .. Date and place unknown. 

QUEEN, JAMES (Sergt.) at Napa, Dec. 7, 1879. 

WEBSTER, JOHN H at Stockton, June 10, 1881. 

MAXFELD, WILLIAM C Date and place unknown. 

9Transftrrc& from C-o. Jf. 

v Lieut. JEREMIAH SHERWOOD to Co. G. 

ECHER, JOHN '. . . . to Regimental Band. 

HIP WOOD, THOMAS (Sergt.) to Co. B. 

v LOW, JAMES C Promoted to Quarter-Master Sergeant. 



010. ** (fi>." 

This Company was organized under the direction of 
Matthew R. Stevenson, a son of the Colonel, to which he 
was subsequently elected Captain, and made the voyage to 
San Francisco in the ship " Thomas H. Perkins." On the 
3d of April *in company with " D," "E" and "I" sailed 
from Monterey in the U. S. Storeship " Lexington." In 
May the Company with Co. " E " re-embarked in the 
" Lexington " for San Pedro, taking post at Los Angeles 
(Head-quarters of the regiment), where the Company remained 
until discharged from the service on the i8th of September, 
1848. 

0. "."' 

3urbibors, Slprtl I5tf), 1882. 
*Lieut. JOHN McH. ROLLINGS WORTH . . . . Georgetown, D. C. 

Member of State Constitutional Convention at Monterey in 1849. 

*Lieut. JEREMIAH SHERWOOD New York City. 

Ex-Member of N. Y. Legislature. 

*ADAMS, JAMES H San Francisco. 

JANTZEN, FREDERIC . . San Francisco. 

KLEINSHOOTH, JOHN Germany. 

*NISBITT, THOMAS Scott River, Siskiyou Co. 

SHIRLAND, E. D Auburn, Placer Co. 

Capt. of Vors, late ivar ; Ex-County Clerk and Recorder of Sacrajnento Co. 

SCHUMAKER, JOHN . . Los Angeles. 



SHROTER, CHARLES ..... . . . . San Francisco. 

PFIESTER, ADOLIMI .. .. .. .. San Jose. 

Ex-Mayor of San Jose, noiu capitalist and merchant. 

TIEROFF, AUGUSTUS . . . ......... San Francisco. 

WELLS, THOMAS JEFFERSON ....... . New York City. 

*WILSON, ROBERT .......... . . Vallejo. 



to it lUbtncj. 

.. was at San Francisco in 1874. 

was at Vallejo in 1874. 

was in Oregon in 1878. 

. .. was at San Francisco in 1874. 

. . . . was at Stockton in 1874. 



CITAQUETH, HERMAN .. 
COY AN, FREDERICK 
FALKNER, JAMES Y. (Corpl.) 
FRESCHE, FRANCIS 
STEVENS, JOHN H 



tOIjcrcafiouts (Hnknofon. 



BOINGER, FREDERIC 
BENNETT, TITUS 
BURGEMAN, EMILE 
CONNELL, JOHN (Sergt.) 
CAULTFIELD, PATRICK 
CAULTFIELD. DAVID 
CLARK. JOHN 
CUMMINGS, JAMES 
COLGAN, JAMES A. 
COPENGER, CHARLES 
CORNING, OTTO 
CUVELLIER, EM1L 
COMSTOCK, CORTEY 
DUNNE, JOHN 
DOOLEY, THOMAS 
DIDDLESON, AUGUSTUS 
EDMONSON, ALFRED 
EUTH, JOHN 
EATON, GEORGE 
FARR, PHILIP 
FITZSIMMONS, JAMES 
GOODWILL, JAMES T. 
HAN TON. MATTHEW O. 
JACKSON, GEORGE (Sergt.) 
JACKSON, GEORGE (2nd) 
JOHNSON, FREDERICK (Corpl.) 
JONES. JOHN 
KAUFMAN, JULIUS 
KENNEDY. WILLIAM A. 
KTRTZ. LEWIS 
LAWRENCE, HENRY (Mas.) 
LII'PKR. A l'( JUSTUS 
LELONG. MARTIN 
LEWIS. HENRY 



LYNCH, JOSEPH P. (Corpl.) 
LINDER, FRANCIS 
MALCOLM, ALEXANDER B. 
MONTRIEL, HERMAN 
MILLER, EDWARD 
MILLER, VALENTINE 
MILLER, CHARLES 
MARK. JOSEPH 

MCDONALD, WILLIAM 
MYERS, JOHN 
NORTHMAN, CHARLES 
OSBORNE, CHARLES 

PFEIFFER, MAX WILLIAM 
PHILLIPS, JAMES 
RUTH, JOHN 
RUSSELL, WILLIAM 
ROSE, JOHN M. 
REISH, JACOB 
ROWAN, JAMES 
ROBINSON, GEORGE (Sergt.) 
SWAB, EMANUEL 
SHISLYLIND, GUSTAFF (Mus.) 
SHULTZE, FREDERIC 
SILTZER, HENRY 
SCHIMER, EARNEST 
SAXTON, CHARLES 
TAYLOR, WALTER (Sergt.) 
T 1 NK E R M A N N, MICHAEL 
UPSON, TRUEMAN 
VALLELY, JOHN 
WARREN, JAMES 
WELLS, WILLIAM 4 

WHEELER, WILLIAM M. 
WEBSTER, CHARLES A. (1st) 



42 



Capt. MATTHEW R. STEVENSON . . 'at Sackett Harbor, Jan. 2, 1863. 
ANDREWS, ALLEN ...... at Los Angeles, Dec. 9, 1847. 

BOSQUE, THOMAS ........ at Los Angeles, Aug. 7, 1847. 

BULTICE, VINCENT ........ Date and place unknown. 

GRIN NELL, CHARLES C ....... Date and place unknown. 

HART, JEROME ........ . . at Shasta, Feb. 4, 1852. 

HOPPER, WILLIAM ........ at Los Angeles, July 12, 1847. 

HAMMER, ROBERT . . . . at Spanish Bar, American River, 1849. 

MEHAN, JAMES (Sergt.) . . . . Killed at Los Angeles, --- , 185. 

OSBOURN, WILLIAM B. . . . . at Los Angeles, July 31, 1867. 

SULLIVAN, JOHN ...... at San Luis Rey, Aug. 25, 1848. 

TR AVERS, WILLIAM B. (Sergt.) . . at Los Angeles, Dec. 10, 18'47. 
THORNER, FRANCOIS ...... at Los Angeles, July 31, 1848. 

TOYE, H. F. H. . . . . . . . . . . Date and place unknown 

TITTLE, AUGUSTUS ...... at San Francisco, Feb. 1, 1868. 

UHRBROOK, HENRY .. .. .. .. at Santa Clara, -- ,1875. 

VANDERBECK, JAMES . . . . at San Francisco, Sept. 23, 1849. 

WEST, THOMAS J ......... Date and place unknown. 

WEBSTER, CHARLES A. (2nd) . . . . at Los Angeles, Aug. 17, 1847. 

WORT, GEORGE ........ at San Francisco, April 5, 1847. 



(Eransfcmt) from (So. (Gt. 

Lieut. WILLIAM H. WEI RICK to Co. F. 

Lieut. WILLIAM H. SMITH I 

V BROWN, PHILIP . . . . " H 

; CARR, STEPHEN " A. 

COOPER, SAMUEL " F. 

^ DUNITCH, ERNEST F to Regimental Band 

FETSCHOROR, CHRISTIAN 

GRAMBIS, FREDERICK 

HASKELL, JOHN W. . . to Co. F. 

HARRIS, STEPHEN .. .. .. Promoted to Qr.- Mr. Sergeant. 

HAUFF, ERNEST to Regimental Band. 

KRAUSS, CHARLES 

KLEINBROTH, JOHN 

LANKOW, EDWARD to Co. B. 

MURRAY, JOHN FRANCIS " H. 

POWERS, EDWARD " F. 

POWERS, JOHN .. .. " *F. 

RICHARDSON, ARTEMUS W " C. 

ROANE, ARCHIBALD " F. 

STALL, ALFRED . . " I. 

TITTLE, GOODLIP ; - L 

TESHNER, CHRISTIAN to Regimental Band. 



43 



OIo. "tj. 11 

This Company was recruited at Albany, N. Y., by John B. Frisbie 
and Edward Gilbert, who upon its organization were elected res 
pectively its captain and first lieutenant. On the evening of the 
3ist of July, 1846, the Company left Albany by steamboat, 
reaching New York early the following morning. The Company 
was escorted from the steambcat to the foot of Whitehall Street 
by Captain Cooke's Company of Artillery and the Albany Wash 
ington Riflemen ; the latter Company fired a salute upon the 
embarkation of the Company at the Battery for Governor's Island, 
the rendezvous of the regiment. 

Upon the embarkation of the regiment this Company was 
assigned to the ship " Susan Drew," and arrived at San Francisco 
on the 1 9th of March 1847, an d was stationed at the Presedio 
until the 5th of Aug., 1848, when it exchanged post with " C " at 
Sonoma. A few weeks later the Company returned to San 
Francisco, and was mustered out of the service on the 25th of 
August, 1848. 



0. "r 



.Surbtbors 



Utij, ISS2. 



*('apt. JOHN B. FRISBIE .......... City of Mexico. 

Nominated for Licrit. Go^>. with Gen. John A. Suiter for Governor at the 
first election for State Officers in California. 

*CORX WELL, GEORGE N ............ Xapa. 

Ex-Prefect of Sonoma District; Ex-Postmaster of Napa, (8 years}; 'Ex-Member 

of the California L,egislature<served several terms; 3 years 

Supervisor, and b years Under Sheriff, Sonoma Co. 



EDMONSOX, - 
FRISBIE, ELEAZER (Sergt.) 
*FOLSOM, WILLIAM H 
*GOLDWAITE, RICHARD M 
GUTHRIE, WILLIAM 
LAMPMAX, WILLIAM I 
*LAPPEUS, JAMES H 



. . . . San Francisco. 

. . Vallejo. 

New York City. 

'.. .. Albany, N.Y. 

Coulterville, Mariposa Co. 

Republic of Mexico. 

Portland, Oregon. 



Ejc-City Marshal of Portland, Oregon; for the past twelve years has l-ccn 
Chief of Police, same city. 

LEE, JAMES R ............... Vallejo. 

*MERRILL, SQUIRE (i. (Mas.) ........ Washington, D. C. 

REID, JOSEPH ................ Xapa. 

*VAX VECIITEX, GEORGE ..* .. .. New BrunsMck, X. J. 

*YATES, JOHN D. . . . ......... Albany, X. Y- 



44 



to fcc itbtng. 



BENJAMIN, FORDYCE I. ...... was at Sonoma in 1874. 

GROW, WILLIAM (Sergt.) ........ was at Yreka in 1878. 

Ex-Sheriff of Siskiyou Co,: Ex-Postmaster at Yreka. 

HUMPHREY, GEORGE L ....... was at Coulterville in 1874. 



AGNEW, HUGH 
BRAUN, PHILIP 
COUTAN, GUSTAVUS J. 
CARRIGAN, THOMAS 
CAMPBELL, PETER 
DAVIS, BENJAMIN B. (Corpl.) 
GORDWELL, JAMES F. 
GERRINGER, ANDREW 
HUMPHREY, GEORGE L. 
HARNES, HENRY 
LATHROP, GEORGE W. 
LAWSON, HENRY 



LEGGETT, WILLIAM . 
LEDDY, MICHAEL 

MCCARTNEY, BARTHOLOMEW 
'MAPLE, JOHN 
NORTON, MARTIN 
NEWMAN, JOHN 

RAMSEY, DAVID (Corpl.) 
SHULTERS, JOHN 
WISSELL, FREDERICK 
WILLIE, HENRY 
WIERZBICKIE, F, P. 



Lieut. EDWARD GILBERT at Oak Grove, near Sacramento, Aug. 2, 1852. 

Member of the State Constitutional Convention at Monterey in 1849: Ex-Member 
of Congress; Ex-Editor and Publisher of the "Alta California.' 1 '' 

Lieut. JOHN S. DAY at Chicago, 111., Oct. 14, 1851. 

BEATTIE, BELDEN (Corpl.) . . . . at San Francisco, , 1849. 



CRAFTS, ALBERT B. 
DAVIS, DAVID A. 
LANDERS, WILLIAM . . 
MURRAY, FRANCIS . . 
MARTIN, WILLIAM H. . . 
O'CONNELL, ANTHONY F. 
PURCELL, MATTHIAS . 



at San Francisco, May 10, 1849. 

at San Jose, Dec, 18, 1848. 

at Mission Dolores, S. F., 1850. 

. . . . Date and place unknown. 

Dry Creek, Stanislaus Co., June 23, 1874. 

. . San Francisco, Jan. 22, 1866. 

San Francisco, -- , 1850. 



SCHOOLCRAFT, HENRY A. (Sergt.) 



at 



ar Aca P ulc . Mex " 



Ex-Collector, Port of Sacramento. 

SHERMAN, HERAN V. S Date and place unknown. 

SLADE, WILLIAM D Date and place unknown. 

Ex-City Marshal of Yreka. 

SMITH, HENRY . . . . Drowned in Feather River, , 1849. 

TIGHE, JOHN Date and place unknown. 

VEEDER, PETER G Date and place unknown. 

WINNE, JAMES (Sergt.) . . Date and place unknown. 



45 



^Transferred from Compami !0. 

FULLER, WILLIAM M. to Co. F. 

IIAKT, JKHOME " G. 

IIOHX, HENRY to Regimental Band. 

ROANE, JOHN 

LOCKWOOD, ISAAC 1 to Co. G. 

PFEIFER, MAX \V ..' .. .. " G. 



^ o. "3." 

This Company was organized at Bath, Steuben Co., N. Y., 
on the 26th day of June, 1846, and took its departure from that 
place on the ist of August en route for Governor's Island, N. Y. 
Harbor. The "Farmers Advocate" of Bath, under date of 
August 5th, 1846, says " The Steuben Volunteers, under Captain 
Shannon, left Bath for New York on Saturday morning. We 
cannot refrain the repetition that we never saw a finer Company, 
all intelligent and vigorous young men, of many different trades, 
excellent habits, urbane manners and enterprising spirits. The 
mutual farewell echoed the best wishes and hopes, and a large 
number of our citizens volunteered carriages and escort to cheer 
them on board the Steuben steamer, which took its departure 
amid the acclamations of the mass of people assembled at the 
wharf." On the 26th day of September they left New York for 
California in the transport " Susan Drew " and arrived at San 
Francisco, on the iQth of March, 1847 ; from thence embarked 
on the " Lexington," in company with Companies " D," " E " 
and " I," and reached Monterey on the 4th of April, where the 
four companies went into camp on the green in front of the 
Catholic Church, which in honor of General Stephen W. -Kearney 
(commanding the Military forces in California), was called 
"Camp Kearney." Upon the departure of Companies "E" 
and "G," for Los Angeles in the "Lexington" on the 5th of 
May (Company "D" having been mounted were sent out 
to hunt for Indian horse thieves on the Tulare Plains), 
Company " I " took post at the barracks in the town. On the 

28th of December the Company embarked on board the 

and sailed for San Deigo, which place they continued 

to garrison until their discharge from the service on the 25th of 
September, 1848. 



46 

0. "3. 11 

Surbibors, lpril 1511), 1882, 
Lieut. PALMER B. HEWLETT Sonoma Co. 

Ex-Brig.-Genl., National Guard State of California. 

*E VANS, JOSEPH (Sergt.) Newark, N. J. 

*KVANS, PLUMMERB. (Corpl.) Hampton, Va. 

Lieut, of Vols. late IVar. 

*EMERSON, JOHN CALVIN Bath, Steuben Co., N.Y. 

*GriBAL, EUGENE Gilroy. 

HITT, CALVIN Winona, Minn. 

*OSGOOD, HENRY M San Luis Obispo. 

SMITH, ELIJAH M Aurora, Mono Co. 

SULLIVAN, CORNELIUS Lompoc, Santa Barbara Co. 

VINCENT, JOSHUA S. (Sergt.) . . . . Linn Creek, Camden Co., Mo. 

* WARD, ANDREW J. Madison, Wis. 

WOOD, JOHN Hanford, Tulare Co. 

*SHARKEY, FRANK L . . Norwich, Conn. 



Lieut. HENRY MAGEE 
Lieut. WILLIAM H. SMITH 
BUND. JOHN .. 
HARMON, DE WITT J. . . 



to fit HUbing. 

was at San Diego in 1874. 

was at Algerine Camp, Tuolumne Co., in 1874. 

was on Calaveras River in 1874. 

was at Murphy's, Calaveras Co., in 1874. 



WYBOURN, ROBERT (Corpl.) 



was in Calaveras Co. in 1874. 



(!Hi)crcabciuts 



BLACK, JAMES 
BROOKS, EDWARD J. 
CASEY, MICHAEL (Corpl.) 
DOODY, PATRICK 
GILLINGHAM, HENRY (Mus.) 
HAUGHTY, MICHAEL 
JOHNSON, IRA 
KEMPST, GEORGE W. 
KELLY, ;JAMES (Mus.) 
KELLY, PHILIP 



LUKER, WILLIAM 
MAPES, WALTER B. 
MORACE, ERASTUS 
NICKERSON, THOMAS 
PERRIN, JAMES 
SMITH, CHARLES 
SEXTON, LORIN 
WIDGER, BENJAMIN 
WITTAM, ISAAC 
ZITTLE, MICHAEL 



Capt. WILLIAM E. SHANNON .. Sacramento, Nov., 1850. 

Alcalde of Coloma District in iS^; Member of the Constitutional Con-vention 
at Monterey, iSqq. 

ALDRICH, JAMES City Point, Va., March 2, 1864. 

BARNUM, EDGAR M Monterey, Sept. 9, 1847. 

BALDWIN, JOSIAH 1, San Jose, Oct., 1850. 

CLARK, JOHN N. . . . . Burrell Spring, Fresno Co., May 12, 1879. 

CHASE, HIRAM . . . . . . . . . . Date and place unknown. 



47 

CONNELL, JOHN . .' . . at Sea, between California and Oregon. 

DOMER. PETER San Diego, June 24, 1848. 

HARDMOUNT. WILLIAM Date and place unknown. 

KANE, PETER Date and place unknown. 

LOGAN, JOSEPH B. (Sergt.) . . Springfield, Tuolumne Co., Oct., 1857. 
LOUNT, SETH H. . . . . Killed by Rogue River Indians in 1855. 

MILLER, AUGUSTUS Date and place unknown. 

MURCII, WILLIAM B. (Corpl.) . . . . Monterey, Oct. 27, 1847. 

SHARP, MATTHEW W near Coloma, in 1850. 

SMITH, CHARLES F Date and place unknown. 

STALL, ALFRED B. . . . . . . . . . . Date and place unknown. 

VAIL, JAMES M. Killed by Indians in Weaver Creek, El Dorado Co. , in 1848. 

VAXKEUSEN, JEREMIAH Aroca, N. Y., Sept., 1855. 

WARBECK, HENRY R San Francisco, ,185. 

UNDERWOOD, G. L Portland, Oregon, Nov. 15, 1881. 

MAPES, GEORGE W Date and place unknown. 



(Transferred from (o. 3. 

Lieut. J. McH. HOLLINGSWORTH to Co. G. 

ERATH, JOHN " G. 

GRAFF, GEORGE J " E. 

JACKSON, JAMES M " G. 

MOUSER, JOHN " D. 

SEARLES, GEORGE " J>. 

SHIRLAND, E. D. " G. 

STALL, ALFRED B. :: G. 



010. " K/ 1 

This Company was recruited in Chenango County, N. Y., 
by Kimball H. Dimmick, a lawyer of Norwich, N. Y., who was 
subsequently elected captain. On the 3d of August, 1846, the 
Company left Chenango Co. for the rendezvous of the regiment 
on Governor's Island, at which place they arrived on the follow 
ing morning. When the regiment embarked for California 
this Company was assigned to the transport " Loo Choo," 
arriving at San Francisco March 26th, 1847. Upon its arrival 
in California the Company was stationed at the Presidio, 
near San Francisco, at which post the Company remained on 
duty until its discharge from the service on the i5th of August, 
1848. 



0. "ft. 11 

.Surbibors, Slpril I5tf), I8S2. 

* ABBOTT, AUSTIN R, (Corpl.) Sacramento. 

*CHRISTIAN, WILLIAM H Utica, N. Y. 

Drig.-Genl. of I'ols. late War. 

KNIGHT, JOHN Ukiah. 

MERRILL, JOHN II . . . . Washington, D. C. 

MERRITT, ROBERT G. Hopville, Mendocino Co. 

O'NEIL, THOMAS . . , Nevada. 

RUGGLES, JOHN Sacramento. 

STOW, AARON . . . . Davenport, Iowa. 



REMINGTON, DARIUS C. 
RODRIAN, CHARLES .. 
WALTHER, GEORGE 



to be HLtbincj. 

. was at Washington Territory in 1874. 

. . was at San Francisco in 1874. 

was at Los Angeles in 1874. 



BROOKS, CHARLES W. 
BANNARD, GEORGE 
BRADY, JAMES 
BROWNING, JOPIN W. 
CROWLEY, MICHAEL 
CARTER, JOHN 
DYE, HAZZARD 
DURKUE, ANTHONY 
FRINK, DANIEL 
FORRESTER, GEORGE H. H. 
FREEBORN, JOHN 
GUILE, WILLIAM (Mus.) 
GRAY, WILLIAM D. 
HUDSON, BENJAMIN 
HOYT, DANIEL C. 
HUNTLEY, EZRA 
JOHNSON, CHARLES F. 
KENDALL, ALVA 
KLOPPER, MICHAEL 



KELLY, JOHN 
KOB, GEORGE 

LEACH, FREDERICK N. (Mus.) 
LOUGHRAY, ANDREW 
LOVELAND, CYRUS C. 
McKAY, JOHN H. 
MAXWELL, JAMES W. 
MURRAY, EDWARD 
RAUSCH, NICHOLAS J. 
SELLERS, JACKSON (Sergt.j 
SMITH, JAMES M. 
STOPPARD, MOSES 
SLEIGHT, PETER 
WHITE, PHILANDER (Corpl..) 
WILKES, JOHN 
WOOLARD, HENRY 
WHEELOCK, LYMAN 
WEIDNEY, ANTHONY 
WHEELER, JOHN 



Capt. KIMBALL H. DIMMICK 



Date and placte unknown. 



Member of the State Constitutional Convention at Monterey, iS^q. Appointed 
by Go7>. B. Riley, Judge First Superior Tribunal of Cal., Nov. /, /<#. 

Lieut. JOHN S. NORRIS ...... in Central America in 1856. 

Lieut. GEORGE C. HUBBARD . . . . - Illinois, _ 185 

Lieut. RODERICK M. MORRISON . . at Carson Creek, April 18, 1849. 



49 



CAMPBELL, WILLIAM 
CALLENDER, MILLS L. . . 
HOMMITCH, JOHN 
LIVINGSTON, PETER F. . . 
MARCH, EDWIN 

NEEB, JOHN 

SISSON, RUEBEN (Corp'l) . : 
WILLIAMSON? THOMAS DENT. 



San Jose, Dec. 18, 1848. 

. .Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 21, 1871. 

San Francisco, Dec. 26, 1876. 

Sonora, Tuolumne Co., Sept. 30, 1873. 

Pleasant Springs, Nov. 2d. 1860. 

Sonoma, Feb. 20, 1874. 

. . Mission, San Rafael, Nov. 30, 1849. 

Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., 187 



(TransftrrtlJ from Co. 



Lieut. THERON R. PER LEE 

f Lieut. GEORGE, D. BREWERTON 

AMES, THADDEUS M 

FORBES, ELI B 

MILLER/VALENTINE 

PFI ESTER, ADOLPH 



to Co. C. 

to 1st U. S. Dragoons. 

to Co. C. 

" F. 

to Regimental Band. 



t Now a resident of Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Rev. T. M. LEAVENWORTH 



now residing in Sonoma Co. 



RECAPITULATION-. 





Survivors 


Supposed 
to be 
Living 


Where 
abouts 
Unknown 


Deceased 


TOTAL 


Field Officers. . . 


1 










Staff Officers 


6 






i 




Captains 


5 






4" 




Lieutenants. . . 


7 


Q 


A 


1 f\ 




Non-Commissioned Staff. 
Regimental Band 






1 ' 


4 


oU 

4 
01 


Non-Coin. Officers and 
Privates 


136 


'30 


40Q 


10-1 


61 

r*n(\ 












< lO 




155 


33 


443 


213 


844 



5 



The ten companies comprising the Regiment were 
mustered out of the service of the United States, 
as follows : 

BY LIEUT. JAS. A. HARDIE (Late- Major of the Regiment), 
3d U. S\ Artillery. 

Company "C," Capt. J. E. Brackett, 

at San Francisco, August i5th, 1848. 
Company "K,"Capt. K. H. Dimmick, 

at San Francisco, August i5th, 1848. 
Company "H," Capt. J. B. Frisbie, 

at San Francisco, August 25th, 1848. 



BY CAPT. A. J. SMITH, 
ist U. S. Dragoons. 

Company "F," Capt. F. J. Lippitt, 

at Santa Barbara, September 8th, 1848- 
Company " E," Capt. Nelson Taylor, 

at Los Angeles, September i8th, 1848. 
Company "G," Capt. M. R. Stevenson, 

at Los Angeles, September i8th, 1848. 
Company " I," Capt. W. E. Shannon, 

at San Diego, September 25th, 1848. 



BY CAPT. HENRY S. BURTON (late Lieut. Col. of the Regiment), 

3d U. S. Artillery. 
Company "A," Capt. S. G. Steele, 

at Monterey, October 23d, 1848. 
Company "B," Lieut. H. C. Mattsell, 

at Monterey, October 23d, 1848. 
Company " D," Capt. H. M. Naglee, 

at Monterey, October 24th, 1848. 



The Field Officers of the Regiment were mustered out of 
service by Capt. H. S. Burton, at Monterey, Cal., October 26th, 
1848. 



5 1 



THE TRANSPORT FLEET. 

The following named vessels conveyed the Regiment to Cali 
fornia, and the information relative to their subsequent career 
has been kindly furnished by the "Sun Mutual Insurance Company 
of New York" as also the "Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company 
jf New York" 

Ship " THOMAS H. PERKINS," 697 tons burden, Arthur, Mas 
ter, with Companies B, F, G, and a portion of Co. E, Col. J. D. 
Stevenson commanding troops. 

This ship was sold during the late civil war to a merchant of 
London, England; name changed to the " Anstruther " of London. 
On the 5th day of December, 1872, this vessel was at Pensacola, 
Florida. 

Ship " Loo CHOO," 639 tons burden, Jas. B. Hatch, Master, 
with Companies A, C, K, and a portion of Co. E, Major Jas. A. 
Hardie, commanding troops. 

This ship was at New York in 1865, no trace of vessel since 
that date. 

Ship " SUSAN DREW," 701 tons burden, Putnam, Master, with 
Companies D, I, H, and a portion of Co. E, Lieut. Col. Henry S. 
Burton commanding troops. 

This ship was sold to British owners, name changed to " Mag- 
dalena," and sailed from San Francisco, February 4th, 1852, for 
Panama; in April, 1852, she was 'reported at Panama. 

Ship "BRUTUS," 463 tons burden, Adams, Master, sailed from 
New York November i3th, 1846, with the officers and men who 
were left at New York at the date of the sailing of the Regiment; 
Capt. Nelson Taylor, of Co. E, commanding detachment. 

This vessel was last recorded as lying in the port of New 
York in the month of July, 1860; for the three years previous 
she had been on a whaling voyage. No record of the vessel can 
be traced since that date. 

Ship "ISABELLA," 649 tons burden, Geo. Briggs, Master, 
sailed from Philadelphia on the i9th day of August, 1847, with 
TOO recruits for the Regiment, in charge of Lieut. Thomas J. 
Roach. 

The "Isabella" was sold in 1863 to parties of Liverpool, 
England, name changed to "Lilla Mansfield; " the year following 
her sale and change of flag she was wrecked on the coast of 

Ireland. 



Ship "SWEDEN," 616 tons burden, Knott, Master, sailed from 
New York in the month of September, 1847, with 100 recruits for 
the Regiment, in charge of Lieut. Thomas E. Ketchum. 

This vessel put into Gibraltar while on a voyage from Leghorn 
to Philadelphia in the month of January, 1860 (another report 
:says April, 1860), was there condemned as unseavvtorthy. 



5 2 

The following interesting article is from the pen of 
Col. TJws. Crosby Lanccy, of San Francisco : 

THE history of the causes which led to 'and the manner in 
which the acquisition -of California was made by the United 
States are at this date almost unknown to perhaps the majority of 
the people who now dwell in this State. To many the events of 
the years before the great influx of the gold seeking population 
who came here in 1849-50 have been unrevealed, and even to 
those who have been cognizant of the thrilling drama enacted 
here, the remembrance has all but faded out. The story of those 
brave and adventurous spirits who long before the cry of gold 
reached the East, borne upon the winds that blew over the Sier 
ras from ocean to ocean conceived and carried out the idea of 
adding California, then a province of Mexico, as another jewel 
to the star en-crowned United States, has never yet been given to 
the world in its completeness, and so to-day, grateful Californians 
know not to whom they are indebted for their fair heritage. 
Without seeking to wrest a single laurel from the many gallant 
men who were here before the war with Mexico (in 1846) broke 
out, the "Post" must concede to the famous Stevenson's Regi 
ment, which arrived in this State from New York during that 
period, a generous share of the honors of the conquest. The 
causes which led to the formation of that command; the trials of 
its commander in selecting suitable men; the purposes for which 
it was organized; its sailing; the voyage, and landing here all 
of these are interesting facts. When the war with Mexico broke 
out Colonel Stevenson was a member of the New York Legislature, 
on the closing session of which he made a speech warmly sup 
porting the Government in its action. Soon after Colonel Steven 
son had business in Washington City, where he called upon his 
old friend, Amos Kendall, then Post Master-General. At the 
house of the latter he was introduced to a prominent Mormon, 
who had just secured permission from President Polk to organize 
a regiment at Council Bluffs to march to California under the 
command of a United States officer. During the conversation 
Colonel Stevenson remarked that he had heard much of Califor 
nia, and would like very much to go there. Mr. Kendall in 
reporting the matter of the organizing of the Mormon regiment, 
incidentally mentioned that Colonel Stevenson was in the city, 
and also mentioned what he said relative to California. The 



53 



President immediately said to Mr. Kendall: " See Colonel Steven 
son, and tell him that if he is disposed to go to California I will 
give him authority to raise a regiment of New York volunteer^." 
Colonel Stevenson was informed of this offer by Mr. Kendall, 
and soon after Gen. J. A. Dix, then Senator from New York, 
also came to his hotel, and told him the President had asked his 
opinion, regarding the idea of sending a detachment by way of 
Cape Horn. He approved of the measure and of the commander 
chosen, as, had he the nomination, he would name Col. Stevenson 
before any other citizen soldier that he knew. Hon. Daniel S. 
Dickinson, also a Senator from New York, likewise tendered his 
congratulations to Colonel Stevenson, and wished him success. 
Colonel Stevenson felt much delicacy in calling upon the Presi 
dent, and therefore delayed doing so until he should receive an 
invitation from him. The next day, after Secretary Marcy had 
told him of what President Polk had said, Colonel Stevenson 
visited the mansion grounds, where on one day in each week, a 
grand out of door musical soiree was given by the band, which 
generally attracted some 5,000 people, and while there a servant 
approached with a request from President Polk who was on the 
rear portico, that the Colonel should step around and see him. 
The Colonel did so, and the President in person requested him 
to call upon him the next day. In the interview on the following 
day the President questioned Colonel Stevenson closely as to his 
previous pursuits and his experience in business. These the 
Colonel answered satisfactorily, and then the President added 
that he had heard him spoken very highly of as a commander 
and a man of ability by Secretary of War Marcy and others, said 
that he was satisfied he would do honor^ to himself in the 
matter, and thereupon gave him authority to raise the regiment. 
Colonel Stevenson then left the executive chamber with orders to 
the Secretary of the Navy, Quartermaster and Commissary Gen 
eral for the necessary arms, supplies and transportation of the 
regiment. The Cabinet approved of the appointment of Colonel 
Stevenson, and heartily entertained the idea of the conquest of 
California. Gen. Winfield Scott,who was also present, thought the 
appointment a good one, and assented to it. Col. Stevenson then 
left for New York, and in the morning the mail brought him the 
official permission to raise the regiment, signed by W. L. Marcy, 
and dated June 26, 1846. The instructions from the Secretary 
were that the regiment should be composed of unmarried men, of 



54 

good habits and varied pursuits, and such as would be likely to 
remain in California or adjoining territory at the close of the war. 
It ,was understood that the recruits must be informed that they 
were to go a long distance, and that they were to enlist for the 
war and no shorter length of time, and that they also might be 
mustered out of service at any point within the United States 
that the commandant named at the conclusion of the war. The' 
notification also read that the command would be expected to 
start early in August, 1846. Upon receipt of this Colonel 
Stevenson, in a communication dated June 3oth, wrote to Silas 
Wright, the Governor of New York, for the necessary permission 
to raise a regiment in the State. To this the Governor graciously 
consented. Up to this time nothing was known of the intended 
movement, and Colonel Stevenson himself had the pleasure of 
announcing it at the usual gathering of all the officers of the 
citizen soldiery of the city of New York, at the Governor's room,, 
upon the 4th of July, 1846. The following day the newspapers 
contained full accounts of the new movement, and on the yth of 
July Colonel Stevenson took up his head-quarters at the old State 
Arsenal in White street, and began receiving recruits for the 
seven companies to be raised in New York City, which, with 
three companies to be recruited in the interior of the State, would 
make ten companies of a, ^regiment of 1,000 men. Colonel 
Stevenson had arranged that his own commission, as well as 
those of his staff, should be issued by the State of New York, 
and he also' had determined that his field and staff should, if pos 
sible, be composed of officers of the regular army or graduates of 
West Point. His reason for desiring that his principal officers 
should be graduates of West Point was that he intended to bring 
the regiment out in three detachments, and he wanted able men 
to command and drill them. Colonel Stevenson had especially 
requested the Secretary of War not to appoint any one to accom 
pany him, except in a military capacity, and then not unless he 
was under his control. As soon as it became generally known 
that a regiment was to be raised for service in California numer 
ous applications for positions were made to the President and 
Secretary of War, all of which' were referred to Colonel Steven 
son. Many applications were made for the positions of Surgeon 
and Assistant-Surgeon to the regiment. The applications were 
referred to the United States Board of Medical Examiners, whc 
recommended Alexander Perry for Surgeon and William C 



55 

Parker for Assistant-Surgeon. Colonel Stevenson, having suc 
ceeded in getting the officers of his choice for the field and staff, 
felt assured of the success of the expedition, and at once turned 
his attention to the organization of the several companies. The 
various officers recruiting these companies had been given full 
and special instructions, and in a very short time ten full compa 
nies of splendid men had been recruited, seven of which were 
from New York, one from Albany and the other two from the 
interior counties of the State. These companies were on the ist 
of August gathered together in general encampment on Govern 
or's Island, N. Y. Harbor, the tents being pitched on a lawn 
between Fort Columbus and Castle Williams. Here, on the first 
day of August, 1846, the regiment was mustered into service by 
Colonel Bankhead, commanding the Second Regiment of Artil 
lery, as the Seventh New York Volunteers. 

There were 38 commissioned officers and 729 non-com 
missioned officers and privates, making a total of 767, rank and 
file. 

The regulations of the service provided that all recruits 
should be surgically examined within four days of their ap 
plication, but at that time the examining physicians were so 
busy elsewhere that it was not until the 2oth of August that 
the Regiment was examined. So strict were the examining 
surgeons that out of the 800 men there, 150 were rejected. 
When it became known that so many had been rejected, over 500 
applications were made for the vacancies within two days. Very 
few members of the Regiment were over twenty-one years of age, 
and no married men, excepting those whose wives accompanied 
the regiment as laundresses, were taken. Some of these rejected 
men were very bitter against Colonel Stevenson, and talked of 
suing him for false imprisonment in keeping them on Governor's 
Island for twenty odd days without having them examined, but 
when the matter was fully explained to them a greater portion at 
once saw that he was not to blame, and relinquished the idea. 

At about this time one Thomas Jefferson Sutherland, who 
had in earlier days organized a band of men to co-operate with 
some discontented spirits in Canada, who were trying to create a 
revolution there, appeared on the scene. This Sutherland, dur 
ing the trouble mentioned, had gathered about 100 men, and had 
taken possession of Navy Island, in the Niagara river, above the 
Falls, and so alarmed the Canadians that they requested the- 



56 

United States to remove them. This was accordingly done by a 
detachment of United States soldiery. From that time until the 
breaking out of the war with Mexico he led a wandering, vaga 
bond life, and when he heard of Colonel Stevenson's intended de 
parture he applied to the Secretary of War for a position in that 
Regiment. The Secretary directed him to Colonel Stevenson, 
without, however, recommending him, or even giving him a note 
to the Colonel on the subject. A few days after he appeared 
before Colonel Stevenson, at Governor's Island, and, although 
a perfect stranger to him asked for a position on his staff. When 
told there was no vacancy, he, with a sublimity of cheek truly 
refreshing, said that while he would prefer going as a military 
man, still he would accept the position of " adviser " to Colonel 
Stevenson, which position he could fill with ability, owing to his 
great military experience. Upon the Colonel's refusing the 
proffered counsel, Sutherland waxed indignant, and saucily told 
that gentleman that he had much powerful influence, and that he 
(the Colonel) would be made to feel the weight of his displeas 
ure, before the command left, if, indeed, he did not entirely pre 
vent its departure. At this the patience of Colonel Stevenson 
became exhausted, and he ordered him from the tent and off the 
camp ground. Nothing more was heard of the would-be 
" adviser " until, some fifteen days before the time appointed for 
the command to sail, the Colonel received a communication from 
the Secretary of War, inclosing a communication from some 
prominent politicians of Philadelphia to President Polk, advising 
him that matters were so shaping at New York that Colonel 
Stevenson might be prevented from going to California in com 
mand of the expedition, and that in case he did not go all of his 
field officers would resign on account of their attachment to him. 
The communication also went on to say that they would recom 
mend for the Colonel's position a certain captain in the New York 
volunteers, and graduate of West Point. This communication, al 
though coming without a word of comment, created quite a dis 
turbance in Col. Stevenson's mind, and he set himself to work care 
fully reviewing his whole life, to see if he could find aught objec 
tionable that his bitterest enemy could point to with scorn or con 
tempt. Although in his forty-sixth year, he could find nothing 
in his whole life, nearly all of which had been passed in New 
York, which he could not justify before the whole community. 
Feeling assured also of the respect and friendship of both the 



57 

President and Secretary of War, he immediately telegraphed the 
latter that the command would sail on the 25th or 26th of Sept 
ember. Preparations for departure were hurried to completion. 

The ships Thomas H. Perkins, Loo Choo, and Susan Drew, 
having been chartered by the Secretary of War and their lower 
holds filled with naval stores, munitions of war, grist and saw 
mills, and everything that was considered necessary for the con 
quest and retention of California, were only awaiting the em 
barkation of the troops to sail. 

A meeting of the junior commanders with their superiors was 
held the day after the dispatch had been sent, which was on the 
23d of September, and then Colonel Stevenson informed them of 
his determination to sail on the 25th. To this the officers de 
murred, they arguing that both the soldiers and sailors, being 
superstitious, would be greatly dissatisfied sailing on a Friday. 
Finally, these unexpected objections having due weight, the 
Colonel made the day of sailing one day later. This arrangement 
was to be kept an entire secret from both the line officers, soldiers, 
and the sailors. The conference then adjourned. At its close a 
young friend of the Colonel's, for whom he had secured a position 
in the Sheriff's office, New York, came into the tent laboring 
under much suppressed excitement, and began revealing a most 
dastardly and cunningly-contrived plot designed to prevent 
Colonel Stevenson from accompanying his Regiment. This young 
man, whom the Colonel had benefitted so much, had not forgotten 
his benefactor, and now, when he found opportunity to do him 
a service, it was eagerly embraced. The startling intelligence 
that he brought was that some seventy or eighty of the dis 
contented rejected applicants previously mentioned had been 
induced by some influence to bring suits for false imprisonment 
against Colonel Stevenson, the damages claimed aggregating 
$80,000. The young man begged Colonel Stevenson not to re 
veal his informant's name, for if he did it would result in his 
losing his place. The whole matter was held as a secret in the 
Sheriff's office. In this the Colonel thought he discerned the 
work of the artful Sutherland and his Pennsylvania friends, and 
at once asked his informant if he had ever seen Sutherland in the 
Sheriff's office. He answered that he had, and that an officer of 
Colonel Stevenson's regiment had also been seen there. The 
writs of attachments in these suits were all ready to be served, 
dnd the Sheriff's officers were only waiting for the actual day of 



sailing to serve them upon the defendant. Having placed his 
friend upon the look-out the young man bade him adieu, after 
promising that if anything new transpired he would inform him 
of it. Immediately after the departure of his young friend orders 
were issued to break camp and to embark, and by nine o'clock on 
Thursday morning, the 24th, the entire command was aboard the 
transports, and the commander of the squadron's flag floated at 
the masthead of the Colonel's ship, where he had his head-quarters. 
The first order issued on shipboard was that no one should be 
permitted to board or leave the ship, except by the written per 
mission of the commanding officer. On Wednesday, after making 
all the arrangements for embarking, the Colonel sent word to his 
motherless daughters, residing at home, in Rutger's place, to 
meet him at twelve o'clock that night at the house of Frank Geroe, 
a friend in Brooklyn, to bid him good-by, as he would be unable 
to visit his home before sailing. Shortly before that hour the 
Colonel stepped into his boat, manned by six trusty men and a 
coxswain, all armed, including the Colonel, with pistols and 
cutlasses, and gave orders to pull for Brooklyn. The night being 
dark and the oars having been muffled the boat reached Brooklyn 
unobserved, and Colonel Stevenson had the pleasure of being 
with his three daughters for an hour, when he bade them a fond 
and an affectionate farewell. The parting was most painful, but 
the young ladies, being cast in a heroic mold, strove to hide their 
feelings of sorrow from their sire and not add to his keen grief. 
Fondly and lovingly he kissed them good-by, then hastened to 
leave the soil of New York, which he has never since then set foot 
upon, and board his vessel. After the command had been gotten 
aboard the greatest precautions were at once taken to prevent any 
of the Sheriff's employes from serving any writs upon Colonel 
Stevenson. The Colonel's boat, with four well-armed men in it, 
was stationed at the foot of the rope ladder, and orders were 
given that any person wanting to come on board should send up 
his card and business from this boat, and if any one attempted to 
force his way on board he should be seized and ironed. 

Men were also stationed at four different parts of the vessel 
with a 32 pound shot within reach, with orders to sink any boat 
that persisted in making fast to the vessel after being ordered off. 
Several attempts were made by the Sheriff's officers to get on 
board to serve their writs, by means of sending up false messages, 
giving other than their own names, and other devices, not one of 



59 

which deceived the grim Colonel, who was not to be caught with 
chaff. One party made a forcible attempt to get aboard, but a 
shot dropped between their boat and the ship by a guard, who 
immediately seized another shot, as if to be more accurate, caused 
the adventurous craft to hastily pull away. All day Thursday 
and Friday this strict guard was kept up. On Thursday afternoon 
Colonel Stevenson called an old man-of-war's-man into his cabin, 
and, knowing that he could rely upon him, explained the situation 
to him, and placed him in charge of the ship's .cannon, with in 
struction to select a corps to man each gun and to see that the 
cannons were carefully loaded with grape and cannister and kept 
ready for instant service. Through the Quartermaster at New 
York, Colonel Stevenson had ordered four steamers (tug-boats 
were then unknown) to be in readiness to tow the flotilla out at 
a given signal, which was to be two cannon shots in quick suc 
cession. These orders were given the captains of the steamers 
under the promise of secrecy, and no other soul on them knew of 
the duty they were to perform. Friday was, perhaps, the most 
anxious day of Colonel Stevenson's life. Still it is doubtful if 
living man could have learned it from his immobile features, calm 
voice or undisturbed manner. He gave audience to many of his 
friends, transacted business with others, and at half-past two 
closed his audience for the day and went on deck to make 
arrangements for doubling guards. Gathering a few of his trusty 
friends about him he explained the situation to them also, and 
told them that he intended to resist arrest at all hazards, even if 
the Sheriff's boat had to be blown out of the water. At about 
three o'clock a small steamer was sighted coming down East 
river, and apparently heading for the vessel. As she approached 
nearer and nearer the Colonel called Captain Turner's attention 
to it, and instructed him, in case she attempted to come along 
side, to hail her and notify the man at the wheel that if he did 
not keep off he would be shot dead where he stood. 

A young German, formerly a soldier in the Prussian army, 
prompt and faithful, was placed in an advantageous position, and 
these orders given: At the word " Ready ! " he was to raise his 
piece which, with but a cap on it, combined with the snap of 
the lock, made a report loud as a derringer and cock it. At the 
word " Aim! " he was to bring down his piece and to draw a bead 
upon the man in the pilot-house of the approaching steamer. All 
these directions were given the man in a loud tone, and could be 



6o 

distinctly heard on board the steamer. A tinkle of the bell, and 
she slowed down to come alongside, driven by her acquired force. 
Just then the officer of the day gave the sentinel the command of 
"Ready!" and up went the gun, the cocking of which sounded 
clear and determined. The order to aim immediately followed, 
when Captain Turner sung out to the steamer's pilot: " I will 
give you five seconds to back your steamer; if she does not move 
you are a dead man! " The pilot looked but one second at the 
captain, another second was taken in glancing down that threaten 
ing gun barrel, and then clang went the bell, and the wheels of 
the steamer began rapidly to back water, and she moved off as 
quickly and as silently as she came, the man at the wheel not 
taking his eyes off that terrible gun until he was well out of range. 
That was the last attempt made to arrest Colonel Stevenson on 
that day. That evening he notified Captain Shields of the United 
States sloop of war "Preble," which vessel was to accompany his 
command, that he should sail early the following morning, the 
26th, and also gave him a dispatch to be sent the President and 
Secretary of War containing the same notification. That same 
evening Colonel Stevenson sent a messenger to notify the steamers 
he had engaged to be alongside at daylight to tow him out, and 
also to tell Deputy Sheriff A. M. C. Smith, who was on the steamer 
which attempted to come alongside of the "" Perkins " that after 
noon, that he (Colonel Stevenson) would never be arrested in that 
harbor, and that he intended to leave at the head of his command, 
peaceably if he could, forcibly if he must. The deputy then said 
to the messenger that the Sheriff was out of town. He had been 
telegraphed the failure to arrest Colonel Stevenson, and had re 
plied that he would return to the city by eight o'clock the next 
morning. The return of the messenger with this report quieted 
Colonel Stevenson's apprehensions, and he turned in, hoping that 
he could leave New York without bloodshed. At dawn on the 
26th he was up and on deck awaiting the coming steamers. While 
thus waiting, an answer to the telegram sent to the President and 
Secretary of War was received. It read as follows: "Your tele 
gram received. Our answer is, God bless and speed you safely 
to your new home;" signed by President Polk and Secretary 
Marcy. 

While this was being read, Robert Martin, news collector for 
the New York Herald, and personal friend of Colonel Steven 
son, came on board, bringing with him the State flag and two 



6i 



guide colors, parts of a stand of colors that the officers of Colonel 
Stevenson's old militia regiment that he had commanded for 
twenty years, learning that the fleet was about to sail, had sent 
on board. Colonel Stevenson received the colors with thanks, 
and taking leave of Martin, gave orders to weigh anchor, and 
in a few moments, the steamers having come along side, the 
little flotilla began moving out down the Narrows. Just at this 
moment, as Colonel Stevenson was looking through his glass, at 
the immense concourse of people gathered on the Battery, he 
saw a large column of men moving along pier No. i to the 
steamer lying at the end of the pier. This he correctly surmised 
to be a Sheriff's posse to arrest him. Towing the " Perkins," 
which had all sails set, were two powerful steamers, and with the 
advantage of an ebb tide it was hoped that she could not be 
overtaken. As the fleet passed out the Narrows, Fort Lafayette 
saluted and the ships responded. As the smoke of the canonad- 
ing cleared away, the little steamer with the Sheriff's posse on 
board was seen rounding Governor's Island. She did not con 
tinue the chase long, for when the fleet rounded Sandy Hook 
naught could be seen of her, even through a glass. At about five 
miles out Colonel Stevenson signalled the vessels to heave to, 
and taking one of the steamers, visited in succession each one of 
them, bidding good-by to his captains, and leaving orders with 
them to rendezvous at Rio de Janeiro. When the steamer ranged 
alongside the "Susan Drew," he noticed that the officer intended 
as his successor by the Philadelphia politicians, and the same 
who had been seen at the Sheriff's office was in the mizzen chains, 
to be the first to have a parting clasp of the hands with Colonel 
Stevenson, who, however, in boarding, did not choose to notice 
his extended hand. When, however, this gentleman placed his 
hand in his, Colonel Stevenson looked him steadily in the eye. 
The officer at that glance flushed guiltily, and knew then that the 
Colonel was aware of his perfidy towards him. Slowly the check 
mated villain withdrew his hand and slunk away. 

As a final salute, each of the ships manned the yards and 
their crews gave three vigorous cheers; then all sail was spread, 
and thus the Regiment left New York for the far western shore. 
When it is remembered that this was the first army ever sent by 
the United States to subjugate and occupy a foreign territory, 
and that never before in the history of the world did a detach 
ment of soldiers go so far to reach the enemy's country, the event 



62 



becomes one of great historical interest. As the returning steam 
ers faded from view, the brave and undaunted commander sought 
the solitude of his cabin, where, kneeling, he devoutly thanked 
his Creator for aiding him safely through the troubles of the few 
days past. 

Always a sufferer from sea-sickness when at sea, Colonel 
Stevenson, admonished by premonitory symptoms of that un 
welcome visitant, as the " Perkins " lost sight of land, hastened 
to make all preparation to resign himself, with as good grace as 
possible, to its consequences. Every part of the vessel was vis 
ited and orders given the officers for a week ahead. None too 
soon were these precautions taken, for Colonel Stevenson had 
the inevitable attack which confined him to his state-room for 
three days, and when he reappeared on deck he was but the 
ghost of his former self, and was so weak that for many days he 
had to be supported by two sturdy soldiers. Others of the com 
mand also suffered from the same infliction. Another of the evils 
of a long voyage is scurvy. This was well guarded against, how 
ever, great care being taken that plenty of wholesome food, and 
in variety, should be served out. The result of this was that 
nothing of the kind appeared. All the officers messed together, 
with the exception of the master of the ship, Captain Arthur. 
This officer, an eccentric personage, was a German by birth, but 
he had mingled so freely with the people of all nations, that his 
nationality was a matter of speculation. He was also most penuri 
ous and ill tempered, and when out of humor, which happened 
often, he was perfectly unbearable. 

Previous to sailing, he asked permission to join the officers' 
mess, adding that he could purchase a supply of pigs, chickens 
and ducks, cheaper than its members could. The proposition was 
acceded to, and the captain proceeded to lay in much live stock 
and poultry. He, however, delayed joining the mess until well 
out to sea, and when, about a week after sailing, it was proposed 
that he should unite with the mess, and that the event should be 
celebrated by a chicken dinner, he cooly informed the astonished 
officers that he had changed his mind, and had concluded not to 
join the mess. If they wanted any chickens, however, he would 
sell the mess any number at fair prices. The officers, disgusted 
at his conduct, did not press him to join the mess, but they bar 
tered for his chickens. Here again they were astonished, for the 
price asked for the chickens was fully three times that which he 



63 

had paid for them, so they concluded not to purchase, consigning 
both the captain and his fowls to hades. This unexpected deter 
mination on the part of his intended victims proved unfortunate 
for the petty speculator; for, the soldiers and crew, learning the 
trick he had served the officers, also declined to buy a single 
fowl from him. This was not the extent of his loss, either; for, 
although he did not sell a chicken, he soon witnessed them 
rapidly disappear, owing to numerous midnight raids, until at 
last not a feather of them was left. The young and succulent 
pigs, too, grew so large and fat, that they had to be killed and 
salted down. No other instance of pilfering on the part of the 
command was recorded on the voyage. During the passage the 
best of discipline was maintained, and there were few viola 
tions of the rules. The command, with one exception, paid strict 
attention to them. This exception was a sergeant of one of the 
companies. An order had been issued that each soldier should 
be in his bunk by nine o'clock, ready to turn in at the tap of the 
drum. This sergeant, in giving the order to his detachment, 
supplemented it with the remark, " I have given you the order 
and I don't care a - - whether you obey it or not." This re 
mark was repeated to Colonel Stevenson, who at once reduced 
the man to the ranks and detailed him for police duty, which 'was 
to clean up the ship. This duty he refused to perform, and so 
he was ordered triced up by the thumbs and wrists; and the 
order was also given to keep him in that position until he was 
ready to make a proper apology for his conduct. This he refused 
to do, and when his captain tried to reason with him he cursed 
and swore like a pirate. He was then left alone to come to his 
senses, but was visited hourly by the ship's surgeon, who, from 
time to time, reported on his physical condition. 

As might have been expected, the punishment of the fractious 
sergeant caused a murmur of discontent forward, until at length, 
seeking to frighten Colonel Stevenson into relaxing his severity, 
Captain Folsom, who had before presumed on his superior's 
friendship, entered his cabin and in rather an insolent manner 
said to him: " Colonel Stevenson, do you know that there will be 
a mutiny on this vessel this afternoon ?" 

"No, sir," replied Colonel Stevenson, "but I do know that 
there will not be a mutiny on board this ship this afternoon; and 
further, Captain Folsom, you know that I sleep over nine hundred 
tons of gunpowder, but you do not know, sir, that I have a train 
laid from that powder to my berth ? " 



6 4 

"What?" stammered the captain. "Colonel Stevenson, you 
surely do not mean to say 

" Yes, sir, I do, and you can rest assured that before I will 
suffer the command of this vessel to pass from me there will not 
be a plank left for a soul on board to cling to; and now, sir, let 
the mutiny proceed! " 

Pale as a spectre, and with his eyes fairly emerging from their 
sockets, the thoroughly alarmed officer hastily excused himself 
and hurried forward, where he, no doubt, imparted the fearful 
threat he had just heard to the malcontents waiting there, who, if 
they had ever entertained mutinous ideas, quickly discarded 
them. r ^he feeling of discontent, however, was not crushed. At 
roll call that evening, and while the men, mustered on deck, were 
being inspected, the soldier undergoing punishment moaned as if 
in pain. At this his bunk-mate, who was standing in line close 
by, brought his piece to the deck in a forcible manner and ex 
claimed, " By G , I would like to see the man that would serve 
me" whack came a blow, given quick as lightning by Colonel 
Stevenson, who, in passing, had caught the sentence ere it was 
finished, and, with a thud, the mutinous soldier fell doubled up 
in a heap upon the deck. Then calmly ordering a sergeant 
to incarcerate the fallen man in the ship's prison and keep 
him on bread and water for ten days, Colonel Stevenson quietly 
proceeded with the inspection. This display of courage and 
firmness had a wholesome effect on the discontented men and on 
the triced-up sergeant, who soon after sent word to Colonel 
Stevenson that he was anxious to make the apology demanded, 
and, on that officer's appearing, did so most humbly He was then 
released, and from that time on both he and the rest of the rebel 
lious spirits behaved themselves as well as the most orderly of 
the command. Thus ended the mutiny predicted by Captain 
Folsom. 

The next event of any importance was the birth of a female 
child. This was born to the wife of Quartermaster-Sergeant 
Stephen Harris. On the same day, also, the "Perkins" fell in 
with her convoy, the sloop "Preble," Captain Shields. The 
officers and crew of this vessel, on learning of the infantile arrival, 
requested permission to name the little stranger, which, being 
granted, the name of Alta California was chosen for her, and so 
three vigorous cheers were given for little Miss Alta California 
Harris by both ships' crews. A few days later, on the 2oth of 



65 

November, the two vessels having in the meantime parted com 
pany, the ki Perkins " entered the bay of Rio de Janeiro, where the 
"Susan Drew," the "LooChoo" and the "Treble" were found to 
have arrived and were at anchor. Here was also the United 
States man-of-war, "Columbia," flagship of Commodore Rosseau, 
commanding the Brazilian Squadron. When the " Perkins ' 
dropped anchor all the vessels manned yards and saluted in 
man-of-war style. Shortly after, an officer was sent from the 
" Perkins " to report to Commodore Rosseau, who soon afterwards 
visited Colonel Stevenson, The " Perkins " was also boarded 
by the Brazilian authorities, who requested that the commander 
of the " Perkins " would honor them by exchanging salutes 
with their forts. Their exchange of courtesies was agreed 
upon, to take place the following day. A communication 
received soon after from Commodore Rosseau, however, made it 
necessary to cancel the arrangement. This communication was 
to the effect that owing to a difficulty between the Brazilian Gov 
ernment and Hon. H. A. Wise, United States Minister at Rio de 
Janeiro, all diplomatic intercourse between the two nations had 
been suspended. The communication ended by saying that as 
Colonel Stevenson commanded an independent expedition, he 
could act as he pleased in the matter. That commander, without 
hesitation, resolved to support Minister Wise, and so sent a mes 
senger ashore to the Brazilian officials to say that it would not be 
desirable to exchange salutes as agreed upon. The following 
day the United States officers in port in a body, upon invitation, 
visited tne various foreign Embassies in that city, but no notice 
was taken of the Brazilian officials. 

This slight did not serve to mollify the people of Brazil in the 
least, and the breach was further widened in the christening of the 
protege of the expedition,which took place the next day. Extensive 
preparations were made for that event. The officers of the 
lt Preble " selected an elegant silver cup, suitably engraved, and 
issued invitations to all of the United States officials to attend the 
christening of Miss Alta California Harris, to take place on board 
the " Columbia," the fleet chaplain officiating. The vessel selected 
was gaily decorated for the occasion, and, at the hour set, all in 
vited were present to participate in the honor to be done the 
daughter of an humble soldier of a great republic. All were aware 
that the child was born famous, for was she not the first child ever 
born whose father formed part of the first expedition of armed 
5 



66 

American emigrant soldiers ever sent by their Government to 
conquer and occupy a foreign province ? Minister Wise was to 
stand god-father, and he and the child's parents, Commodore 
Rosseau, Colonel Stevenson and the chaplain, occupied a central 
position on the deck. The interesting ceremony was performed 
and Minister Wise followed in a speech. Unfortunately, in con 
cluding, he drew a comparison between the christening of a 
daughter of an American soldier and a similar event which had 
taken place on shore a few days previous in which the " royal 
bantling of the Brazilian Nation," as he termed the child, had been 
the principal. The ceremony on the "Columbia " was concluded 
by hearty cheering and the firing of salutes from every vessel in the 
fleet. The insult so regarded offered by Minister Wise, coming 
to the knowledge of the Court of Brazil, a cabinet meeting was 
called and the question of ordering every American vessel out of 
the port was debated. Learning of this proposed action, Colonel 
Stevenson visited first the most distant vessel of his fleet, and in 
a speech to the officers and men, countermanded the order allow 
ing a portion of the command liberty on shore each day, and ex 
plaining matters, said that he expected that Commodore Rosseau 
would refuse to obey the order. In that case it would be his duty 
to stand by him, and that a conflict between their vessels and the 
vessels and batteries of Brazil would be inevitable. That being 
the case, he said that the next time they went ashore it would be 
with fixed bayonets. This announcement had an electrical effect 
upon the men. They jumped into the rigging and uttered cheer 
after cheer. Those on the nearest vessel, while not understand 
ing the cause of the outburst, became excited also, and they, too, 
joined in the enthusiastic hurrah. And thus, from vessel to ves 
sel, cheer followed cheer, and when Colonel Stevenson was rowed 
to each ship in turn, and they also were told the news, the men, 
knowing the cause of the outburst, cheered louder than before. 
All this time the scene, on shore was of the liveliest nature. 

Upon the quay fully 20,000 people had gathered, curious to 
know what the Americans were growing so demonstrative about. 
Then, after waiting till the excitement had subsided on ship 
board, the swarming piers gradually grew less crowded, until 
finally the docks resumed their wonted appearance. A few hours 
after Commodore Rosseau thanked Colonel Stevenson, in person, 
for his proffered aid, and told him that he (Colonel Stevenson) had 
interpreted correctly what his action would be in case the decree 



6 7 

was 'made. No such summary step as contemplated by the 
Brazilian authorities was ever taken, for the Emperor of Brazil 
opposed the issuance of such an order, but insisted on demanding 
the recall of Minister Wise by the United States Government, which 
demand was subsequently acceded to. A careful and complete 
report of his own action in the affair was forwarded the Secretary 
of War by Colonel Stevenson, an acknowledgment, without com 
ment, of the receipt of which was duly received by him when he 
arrived in California. A few days after this episode the sailing 
orders were given to the fleet, and the four vessels once again 
breasted the ocean with all sail set, bound round the Horn. 
Nothing further of importance transpired on board the "Per 
kins" during the remainder of the voyage. The health and dis 
cipline of the Command were perfect. Favored with fair weather 
and fresh breezes the good ship rapidly neared her destination, 
until in the latter part of February, 1847, the welcome shores of 
California appeared in the horizon. A few days sail along the 
coast brought the vessel off the heads, and on the 6th of March, 
1847, the "Perkins" sailed proudly through the Golden Gate, 
and at three o'clock rounded to and came to an anchor opposite 
the little town of Yerba Buena. The United States sloop-of-war, 
" Cyane," Captain Dupont, was in the harbor, and from its officers 
Colonel Stevenson learned that the town was held by a detach 
ment of the United States Marine Corps, under Lieutenant Tan- 
sell. General Stephen W. Kearney, commanding the Department 
of the Pacific was at Monterey, and to him Colonel Stevenson 
sent a courier announcing his arrival. 

The "Perkins," "Loo Choo," and " Susan Drew" reached 
Rio de Janeiro the same day, Nov. 20, and sailed together 
on the 29th ; at Rio de Janeiro, Captain James M. Turner 
resigned and returned home, and in the " Loo Choo," off 
Cape Horn, First Lieut. William R. Tremmels died. The 
<l Perkins" reached San Francisco, March 6, 1847, 165 days 
from N. Y., having lost four by death and gained two by birth. 
The " Susan Drew" reached San Francisco March 19, 1847. 

The " Loo Choo " struck a calm near the tropics which 
lengthened her passage, and it was during this calm that the poet 
of the ship wrote these lines which were published in the early 
papers of San Francisco. I only remember the following line, 

" The old Loo Choo seemed dreaming 
So idly did she lay." 



68 

The following, which was written on board, Feb. 25, 1847, 
setting forth the objects of this visit to California, will be, I 
think, welcomed by all the survivors of that Regiment. 

COLUMBIA'S GREETING TO CALIFORNIA. 

BY W. M., FIRST REG'T N. Y. S. V. 

California, awake ! arise ! 'tis time to sleep no more, 

The bright warm sun is even now the mountains peeping o'er'; 

Awake ! the night is speeding fast, the clouds have passed away, 

Already break the first faint beams of the fast coming day, 

And yet, though dark and heavy night has shrouded o'er the mind, 

Fair nature in material things has bounteous been and kind. 

Thy sleep was in defiance of each rich and saving boon, 

A dull and deep Siesta, 'neath the broad full light of noon ! 

But now the waking hour is nigh, we come to set thee free, 

We come as doth the else unfruitful sea, 

To speed upon thy bosom, the barks of wealth and peace, 

To multiply a thousand fold the bounteous land's increase ; 

We come to bring thee blessings rare, which freedom's age hath shed, 

Outgushing rich and plenteous as a mighty river head; 

We come to scatter then abroad, rich seed, which sown, shall be, 

Productive of a happy race, a people wise and free. 

Columbia sends her people on a message unto thee, 

She would that you were happy, she would that ye were free ; 

Receive from her, her people, receive from her, her laws, 

Receive from her the spirit of His great and glorious cause, 

And when the Future shall mature, what now receives its birth, 

When California stands among the mighty powers of earth, 

When knowledge, Freedom, and the arts, have bro't forth glorious fruit. 

Each rivaling the other in one common grand pursuit. 

Then, Calif ornians, pause to think, who brought these blessings rare, 

Think who it was first pealed the note of freedom on the air, 

And you will learn with heartfelt praise, to bless the happy day, 

When freedom took its westward flight to California. 

U.S. TRANSPORT SHIP, "Loo CHOO," Feb. 25, 1847. 

Andrew J. Cox in the Napa Register of October n, 1879, 
says: "When Stevenson's Regiment arrived at San Francisco, in 
March, 1847, there were only four practical printers in California. 
They were Robert Semple, Edward C. Kemble, Sam. Brannan 
and P. H. Dunne, who froze his feet in attempting to rescue the 
Donner party. That the Regiment added 13 more. They 
were Edward Gilbert, G. C. Hubbard, Walter Murray, James 
O'Sullivan, David Norris, B. F. Foster, Joshua Rand, William 
J. Weaver, William Layden, Bela Gushing, Wm. Slade, J. D. Yates 
and Andrew J. Cox. Kemble and Yates were living in New 
York in 1879, Norris and Sullivan, Brannan and Cox were living 
in California 1879-80, and all the rest are dead except, perhaps, 
Weaver. 



. 6 9 



RESCUE OF PRISONERS OF WAR AT SAN 
ANTONIO, L. C. 



CAPTAIN STEELE'S REPORT 

LA PAZ BARRACKS, 
Lower California, March 20, 1848. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that, in compliance with your 
order, I took command of the mounted force destined for an in 
cursion into the interior. On the i5th, and between the hours of 
9 and IO.P. M., we started. On examination, I found our whole 
force consisted of 27 non-commissioned officers and privates, 
three officers (Surgeon Alexander Perry, Acting Lieut. Scott, B 
company and myself), Lieut. Halleck, United States Engineers, 
who kindly volunteered his valuable experience and services, and 
Messrs. Herman Ehrenberg and Taylor, residents of this place, 
and three guides, Calif ornians (aggregate 34). On conferring 
with the officers, we were unanimous in the conclusion to pro 
ceed with all possible speed direct to San Antonio (the head 
quarters of the enemy), instead of attacking the advance party 
at the ranche of Noviellas, with the principal object of rescuing 
the American prisoners of war confined there, and doing all else 
we could. 

We took the route by the ranche of the Tuscalamas. Proceed 
ing cautiously, we passed an outpost of some fifty men, without 
being observed by them, and reached the top of the mountain, 
overlooking and eight miles distant from San Antonio, at day 
light on the following morning, where we captured one of the 
" enemy's pickets," and quickening our speed, we descended and 
passed up the arroyo to the east of the town, and, arranging the 
men, we charged into the town at full speed. A small party 
having been previously detailed to secure the persons of the 
officers of the enemy ; the rest were directed against the building 
occupied as a cuartel for the soldiers; and not finding any there, 
one of the liberated captives directed my attention to a building 
on the other side of the arroyo, to the east of the town, distant 
from the Plaza about 150 yards, and commanding it (to which I 
afterwards learned the soldiers had been removed but the dav 



yo 

previous, thereby deranging all our previous plans of attack), 
from which, with a small force of the enemy drawn up in front, a 
brisk fire of musketry opened upon us. 

Having first gained our object in rescuing our men, besides 
taking two of their officers prisoners, I ordered the men to dis 
mount and rally under cover of the church on the east side of 
the Plaza. 

The party sent to secure the officers were unsuccessful in 
securing the commandant (he escaped in his night clothes, 
having just arisen from his bed) but the second in command, 
Captain Calderon, and the Adjutant Lieutenant Arsse, were 
taken, their flag and the private and public papers secured. 
When a sufficient number of our men had rallied, we sallied out 
and charged the enemy in position, and drove them in all direc 
tions to the adjacent hills, killing three of their number and 
wounding seven or eight. The rout of their force being com 
plete, which we learned amounted to some fifty men, and being 
too tired to pursue them, we collected all the arms they aban 
doned (some thirty), their trumpet, bullet-moulds, etc., destroyed 
them and left them in the Plaza, as it was impossible to carry 
them with us. 

I have to record the loss of one of our number, Sergeant 
Thomas M. Hipwood, of B company, who fell dead in the charge, 
pierced by a bayonet and two balls. " A better and a truer man 
never fell in his country's service or the performance of his duty; 
and his loss will ever be lamented by those who knew his worth." 

Pantaloons, cravats, hats, horses, saddles, attest the numerous 
narrow escapes, but none wounded. 

Not more than half an hour elapsed before we were on our 
way back. We halted at a ranche after travelling some ten miles 
(owing to the accession of our number of men, and but one or 
two horses, many had to walk that distance), for the first time, to 
refresh. In two hours we were on our way again, but little 
recruited in strength. Proceeding slowly, we reached the moun 
tain pass of Trincheras a little before sunset, and were just enter 
ing an arroyo, bordered by elevated banks and a thick growth 
of underbrush, when a fierce fire of musketry opened upon us in 
front; a dismount and rally in front was but the work of an 
instant, the men standing fire like veterans. I ordered the 
advance guard to deploy to the right and left, who drove them 
from tree to tree and hill to hill, while the main body proceeded 



slowly, leading their horses, until we had passed the dangerous 
ground, when we mounted and took a different road, diverging 
to the right, which would make the distance much further, but 
the travelling much safer. 

There was none wounded on our side. One of the captives, 
Captain Chalderon, received a severe wound from a rifle ball in 
the right breast from the fire of the enemy, which did not prevent 
his riding, however; the horses received several wounds, but not 
so as to disable them. The loss on the part of the enemy was 
some five or six killed and wounded. We continued our march, 
proceeded some three miles further, when our rear guard was 
attacked; but on firing one musket at them they scampered off, 
and scarcely a charge ensued. We proceeded cautiously, but our 
horses were getting now so fatigued that they would lie down, 
and it was with the greatest perseverance and exertion that we 
continued advancing, but finally arrived at the barracks on the 
morning of the iyth at 2 p. M. 

Having accomplished the extraordinary distance of 120 miles 
(the route we took) in less than thirty hours on the same horses, 
with but little food or refreshment, stopping but once to feed, 
through the most rocky country and the roughest road that can 
be travelled, and by men, many of them, totally unused to riding, 
and without any previous preparation, I cannot express in terms 
too commendatory the coolness and bravery displayed by the 
men of my command. Acting Lieutenant Scott, B company, 
Sergeant Peasley, A company, and Sergeant Denniston, B com 
pany, were conspicuous. 

To Surgeon Alexander Perry, Lieutenant Halleck, United 
States Engineers, most sincere thanks are due for their counsel' 
and assistance. And to Mr. Herman Ehrenberg, "my volunteer 
aid," to say that he fully sustained that reputation for gallantry, 
coolness and bravery that has been awarded to him on former 
occasions, is enough. x 

And to Luz, Morano, and to Juan de Dios Talamantis, our 
Californian guides, I am greatly indebted; their bravery and 
fidelity deserve to be duly appreciated. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SEYMOUR G. STEELE, 
Captain ist New York Regiment, commanding. 
To Lieut. Colonel HENRY S. BURTON, 

United States Army, commanding U. -S. forces, &c. 



[Letter of Col. Stevenson to Col. Mason in behalf of the Men of his 
Regiment.] 

HKAD-QUARTERS SOUTHERN MILITARY DISTRICT, CALIFORNIA, 
Los Angeles, California, August 20, 1848. 

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
several communications of the 8th, and proclamation of the yth 
instant, together with department orders Nos. 50 and 52, announc 
ing the conclusion of a treaty of peace between the United States 
and Mexico, and containing instructions for the disbanding of 
the First Regiment New York Volunteers under my command. 
Earnestly as all have desired such an event, the very sudden and 
unexpected termination of our service has surprised us all, and 
found many a poor fellow, who has served his country faithfully 
for more than two years, without a dollar beyond' the small 
amount of pay that will be due them at the time of their dis 
charge; and if they pay the few small debts they owe here, they 
will not have money sufficient to buy a pair of shoes; and I know 
that many, if not all at this post, possess so high a sense of honor 
that they would go barefooted rather than leave in debt to any 
one in the town. Thank God, all here have acted honorably 
and fairly to the people of the country, and I trust they will do 
so to the end. Yet, hard as their case is, they do not complain 
of the want of anything but the means of defence; for when they 
are disbanded, not ten men will have either a gun or pistol; and 
I assure you, great fears are entertained, and not without just 
cause, that they will be wanted, as well for their defence against 
Indians as against some miserable wretches of the country, who 
already threaten not only to attack all Americans, but the fami 
lies of the people of the country who have been friendly to us. 
My men complain that the Mormons retained their arms, and 
were allowed transportation to the Salt Lake, for seven months* 
service, and supplied with twenty rounds of cartridges each, 
while they, who have served more than two years and travelled 
thousands of miles on the ocean to come here in the service of 
their country, are to be discharged without an arm for their de 
fence, or a dollar of commutation; and some of them (the last 
recruits) had their arms taken from them at Monterey, which, 
unless you have sent them down in the " Anita," they will, in all 
human probability, never receive. Soon after I arrived in this 
country, in a frank conversation with General Kearny on this 



73 

very subject, he assured me that my men should be allowed to 
retain their arms, as he had no doubt if it had been suggested to 
the authorities at home before sailing, it would have been author 
ized, as they were in-tended for, and would become, permanent 
residents of the country. He said he made the stipulation with 
the Mormons, and he felt authorized to make it with me for my 
men; and the day he left here for the United States he assured 
me that he would leave such instructions with you as would 
insure 'it. A- very large number of my men here must remain 
until they can raise the means of reaching the upper country, or 
go up on foot; which would be a most toilsome and perilous 
journey, unarmed as they will be. Under these circumstances, I 
have deemed it my duty to present you their most earnest appeal 
that you will allow them to retain their arms, and that fifteen 
days' rations of such stores as are at the post may be served 
out to them on the day they are disbanded. They would 
not ask this favor of the Government if they could in any manner 
dispose of the land or money scrip. I present this, their petition, 
most cheerfully, because I feel that they more than deserve it at 
the hands of their Government; for no soldiers, either regulars 
or volunteers, have ever surpassed them in correct, honorable 
and manly deportment, or in a most faithful and diligent dis 
charge of the duty required of them as soldiers. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. D. STEVENSON, 
Colonel 1st New York Regiment, 
Commanding Southern Military District. 

To Colonel R. B. MASON, 

ist United States Dragoons, Gorernor of Calif orjiia. 



[Extract from Letter of Col. Mason to the Adjutant-General of the Army. 

HEAD-QUARTERS, TENTH MILITARY DEPARTMENT, 
MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA, June 17, 1848. 



This regiment, you are aware, had been strung from Sonoma 
in the north to San Jose, in Lower California, during their whole 



74 

time of service in this quarter. The companies stationed at 
La Paz (Steele's and Matsell's) held that town for many weeks 
against four times their numbers; and the very moment they 
were reinforced by Naglee's company with additional recruits, 
they took the field under the command of Lieutenant Colonel 
Burton, routed the enemy, completely dispersed them, and restored 
peace to the peninsula. Colonel Burton speaks highly of the 
courage and coolness of his men and officers under fire ; 
and I refer you to his report for individual acts of gallantry. 
Lieutenant Colonel Burton, throughout his whole conduct 
whilst in command of the forces in Lower California, 
completely executed his instructions, which were based upon 
the orders from the War Department ; and as his reports 
and copies of his instructions are already in your office, I 
need only add my present approval of his conduct. He is 
now on duty at this place, in command of his company F, 3d 
Artillery. 

Colonel J. D. Stevenson, since April, 1847, has been in com 
mand of the district of country embracing Santa Barbara, Los 
Angeles, and San Diego, has by energy and good management, 
maintained most excellent discipline amongst his men, and has 
preserved harmony amongst the population of that district, which 
is composed mostly of the native Californians. This required 
peculiar tact and firmness qualities possessed by him in a pecu 
liar degree. I will warrant that at no previous time in that dis 
trict were life and property so secure, the magistrates of the 
country so effectually supported, and industry so encouraged, as 
during the past two years; one common cry of regret arose at 
the order for their disbandment; the little petty causes of com 
plaint were forgotten in the remembrance of the more substan 
tial advantages they had enjoyed under the protection of the 
military. Subalterns and men are entitled to share with their 
commander the honor due for this creditable state of feeling 
on the part of a people nominally conquered. That part 
of California lying on the bay of San Francisco has been 
under the command of the Major of this regiment, 
James A. Hardie, who has effectually aided the civil 
authorities, dispelled the fears of the threatened Indian 
incursions, and guarded the heavy depot at San Francisco 
duties which were performed to the best advantage with the 
limited force at his command. His officers and men were gen- 



75 

erally attentive to their duties, and anxious to serve the United 
States. 

******* 

R. B. MASON, 

Colonel ist Dragoons, Commanding. 
To Brig. Gen. R. JONES. 

Adjutant General, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C. 



[Extract from letter of Lieut. Sherman to Lieut. Colonel Burton.] 

HEAD-QUARTERS TENTH MILITARY DEPARTMENT, 
MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA, June iyth, 1848. 



I take great pleasure in communicating to you Colonel Mason's 
great satisfaction^ hearing of your dispersing the enemy's forces 
at Todos Santos, and of the previous rescue of the American 
prisoners at San Antonio, by the party under the immediate com 
mand of Captain Steele, First New York Volunteers. These 
operations were alike creditable in their conception and execu 
tion. 

Colonel Mason wishes you to convey to the officers and men 
under your command his thanks for their gallantry and good 
conduct displayed on those occasions. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

W. T. SHERMAN, 

ist Lieut, jd Artillery, A. A. A. General. 

To Lieutenant Colonel H. S. BURTON, 

Commanding in Lower California. 



[Extract from a letter written by General Nelson Taylor, of South Norwalk, 
Conn. Many of the facts related in the letter of General Taylor having already 
appeared in other parts of this work, are omitted here.] 

SOUTH NORWALK, CONN., February ist, 1882. 

FRIEND CLARK In response to your request, asking for in 
formation in relation to our old regiment, or more particularly, 
that portion of the command with which I served, has been 



76 

received, and I will endeavor to comply with your wishes, not 
withstanding thirty-five years have nearly elapsed since our dis 
charge from the service on the Pacific coast, and only memory to 
rely upon. 



During the summer of 1848 an order was received by Col. R. 
B. Mason, commanding Tenth Military Department, from the 
War Department, directing that Col. Stevenson's regiment should 
be designated thereafter the " First Regiment New York Volun 
teers," instead of the Seventh, as heretofore. This fact was never 
generally known outside of California, and the regiment, subse 
quently organized and commanded by Colonel Ward B. Burnett, 
which served in Mexico, has always been known as the First 
Regiment New York Volunteers, when it should have been desig 
nated as the Second, and was so designated in an official order 
issued by the War Department* in 1847. There were but two 
regiments organized in the State of New York during the Mexi 
can war, ours being the First. 

On the night of December yth, 1847, a casualty occurred at 
Los Angeles which cast a gloom over the entire garrison, and so 
impressed the commander, that its influence seemed to be felt to 
the end of the organization. An old lady called on the Colonel 
that afternoon, and informed him that a large body of Californians 
had organized, and intended to attempt the re-taking of the city 
that night. Being the officer of the day, I was summoned to the 
Colonel's quarters and informed of the substance of the lady's 
story, and, as a consequence, special vigilance was enjoined on the 
officer of the guard and each sentry on post. At midnight I 
visited the guard, as also each sentry on post, and finding every 
thing quiet, and believing this story to be as groundless as a 
hundred other similar ones which had preceded it, I went to my 
quarters, and in about twenty minutes, certainly not more than 
half an hour afterwards, I was brought suddenly to my feet by 
the report of a terrible explosion. Believing that an attack had 
actually been made, the whole command were promptly got 
under arms at the tparracks; and after waiting a reasonable time, 
and hearing nothing further, I proceeded to the guard-house, 
situated on a side hill overlooking the city, and never will the sad 
spectacle which presented itself to my view, as I approached its 
precincts, be forgotten. The night *was quite dark, and before I 



77 

could fairly see what had occurred, I was startled with the sound 
of voices giving expression to the most intense suffering, and, on 
approaching nearer, I found a portion of the guard-house blown 
down; one or two men were lying dead on the ground; a number 
slightly, a number seriously, and two or three mortally injured, 
and the remainder in the greatest confusion. 

On an investigation it was ascertained that private Earl, of 
Company E, on post a short distance from the guard-house, 
challenged a horseman, who made a response, but continued to 
ride towards the sentry, when the challenge was repeated with no 
better success, and, thinking an attempt was being made to ride 
him down, Earl fired his musket and retreated towards the guard 
house. The report of the gun having been heard at the guard 
house, the guard was promptly turned out and formed, when a 
soldier of Company G lighted a port fire to use on a piece of 
artillery stationed at the guard-house, if the emergency of the 
case demanded. The officer of the guard retained the men 
under arms until he satisfied himself that Earl's horseman was 
an imaginary one, or that he had been frightened away by the 
shot from Earl's musket, when he ordered the ranks broken, 
and directed the man with the port fire to extinguish and return 
it to the arm chest from whence it had been taken. The arm. 
chest was kept in the room of the officer of the guard, and was 
well filled with amunition. The man, not understanding the 
almost impossibility of extinguishing a lighted port fire without 
cutting off the lighted end, stamped it until it was black, and, as 
he doubtless thought, extinguished the fire, when he threw it 
back into the chest, and closed the lid. In a very few minutes 
the hidden spark rekindled, fired and exploded the amunition, 
causing the painful and distressing scene which ensued. The 
poor fellow, who had so unwittingly caused the sad casualty, was 
not found until the next day; he had paid the full penalty of his 
ignorance or carelessness, or both. The loss in men fell on Com 
pany G of our regiment, and Company C, Hirst U. S. Dragoons. 
Three or four of Company E were injured, and they but slightly. 



In closing this brief sketch of my recollection of that portion 
of the regiment with which I served, it is my desire to pay a well 
merited tribute to a worthy officer, that was the Colonel of the 
regiment, Jonathan D. Stevenson. 



78 

Doubtless, with the experience he now has, if called upon to 
organize and command another regiment he would leave undone 
many things which he felt called upon to do, and do many others 
which he left undone. Such, I believe to be the feeling of most 
men having had the experience of organizing and commanding 
regiments; but upon a careful review of his colonelcy, I entertain 
the opinion that few volunteer officers who served during the 
Mexican war, acquitted themselves with more advantage to the 
Government, or greater credit to themselves, 

It is true he performed no brilliant military achievement in the 
field, where honor is sought at the cannon's mouth; his lines 
happened to fall in more pleasant places; yet, if occasion had 
called for it, and opportunity offered, there is no doubt but that 
his field services would have been as distinguished and credita 
ble as was his civil administration satisfactory to the citizens of 
his military district. To his superior administrative and execu 
tive ability is due, in my humble opinion, the peace and good 
order that prevailed so uninterruptedly throughout the lower 
portion of Upper California after he assumed the command of 
that district. 

His intercourse with those who were brought in contact with 
him officially or otherwise, was ever characterized with the easy 
and agreeable courtesy which betokens a well-bred gentleman, 
and which deservedly made him popular, both with the soldiers 
of his command and the citizens of his military district. 

It is many years since it was my good pleasure to meet the 
Colonel, whom, I learn, stiil remains a citizen of the Golden 
State, and which he has never left for a single day, since he first 
landed on its shores in command of our regiment. Let him 
reside where he may, he has my best wishes for all the worldly 
prosperity and mental contentment which can fall to the lot of 
man. 

Truly yours, NELSON TAYLOR, 

Formerly Captain Co. E. 

The military forces in Cal. in April, 1847, were about as folows: 
One Company ist U. S. Dragoons, ... 88 men. 

One Company 3d U. S. Artillery, 107 men. 

Ten Companies N. Y. Volunteers, - 550 men. 

Five Companies Mormon Battalion, - 314 men. 

Total, 1,059 



79 



MEXICAN CALIFORNIA. 

The following chapter from a work recently published by Major 
Bell, entitled "Reminiscences of a Ranger," gives to those who 
are unfamiliar with California prior to its acquisition by the 
Americans, a truthful account of the simple, pastoral life of its 
inhabitants. Major Bell says: 

" If T am correct, before the coming of the gringo in '46, the 
Mexican province of California contained a population of 30,000, 
not counting the Indians. This population extended along the 
coast from San Diega to Sonoma, a distance of say 600 miles. 
There being only a few towns, San Diego being first, then Los 
Angeles, Santa Barbara, San Luis, Obispo, Monterey, Santa Cruz, 
San Jose, Yerba Buena, and last of all, going north, Sonoma. 
Los Angeles was the largest, containing a population of about 
2,000. Next came Santa Barbara and Monterey, mere villages. 
Now, it is quite easy for the reader to perceive that the major 
part of the population dwelt on the ranchos. These ranchos 
ranged in size from one to* eleven leagues that is, in round 
numbers, from five thousand to fifty thousand acres. The owner 
of each rancho possessed from one thousand to ten thousand 
head of horned cattle, and from one or two hundred to three or 
four thousand head of horses, broken and bronco. The country, 
even when the value of a bullock was his hide, tallow and horns, 
was prosperous, and money plenty. The rancheros dressed well, 
were well housed, and had an abundance of store home produce 
and foreign importation. 

" The hospitality of the California ranchero was a proverb. A 
person, though he may have been a stranger to the country born, 
could start from San Diego and journey to Sonoma without it 
costing him a dollar, and be furnished with a fresh horse at every 
rancho, leaving instead the one of the previous day's ride. Such 
a thing as charging a traveler for what he received would have 
been considered an act of excessive meanness. The social inter 
course and amusements of these isolated people were in keeping 
with their situation. Religious fiestas were celebrated at the 
Pueblos and Missions with great pomp and ceremony, and 
afforded a pleasant recreation and relief from the monotony of 
ranch life. When the daughter of a ranchero married, the family 
either gave a grand fiesta at the rancho or a baile at the Pueblo or 



8o 



Mission, to which the whole country were invited, except the 
lower classes, and to which the people came sometimes a distance 
of forty leagues or more, families traveling in their elaborately 
fixed up carretas, and the beaux transporting the belles before 
them on their elegant saddles, the bean occupying a seat on the 
croup, with his bridle arm resting on the shoulder of his fair 
passenger, or encircling her slender waist. While the families 
were absent on these social expeditions nothing would go amiss 
on the ranchos. The major-domo and the Indian vaqueros 
would look out for the herds as though the patron were present; 
the grass would grow and the cattle would thrive and multiply. 
These marriage feasts would be of three or four days' duration. 
Dancing at night and horse racing during the day, and generally 
winding up with bull-fighting. The religious feasts, celebrated 
at the churches, were brilliant, pompous, expensive and imposing, 
the most important of which were the feast of the Holy Week, 
Corpus Christi and St. John's Day. the latter being devoted, to 
cock-fighting and kindred amusements, one of which was to take 
a live cock, and, after plucking the feathers from and thoroughly 
greasing his neck, his body would be buried in the middle of the 
street or road, the greased neck alone being exposed above the 
ground. Now, the game was to dash past the buried cock at full 
speed on horseback, and lean over and seize the neck and pull 
the cock from the ground a most difficult performance. The 
feast of Corpus Christi was one of peculiar religious observance 
one of processions, parades and displays. The feast of the 
Holy Week always ended with a tragedy on the Saturday of 
Glory, in the annual execution of that eminent traitor, Judas 
Iscariot, which was done by first erecting a gibbet; then' an effigy 
of Judas was brought forth from an imaginary prison, mounted 
on a cart, with the arms pinioned, and being guarded by a file of 
soldiers, was drawn around the plaza and principal streets, fol 
lowed by the excited crowd, hooted at, insulted and pelted by 
the boys and others, and finally, in a most dilapidated and dis 
graceful condition, was halted in front of the gibbet. Now, an 
orator from the crowd comes forward and delivers a solemn lec 
ture to Judas, and gives him fits, makes his bow and retires, and 
is succeeded by another orator, who gives Judas another berat 
ing, and accuses him of crimes so contemptible and manifold 
that, as an impartial judge, one feels constrained to take sides 
with the old sinner, and declare one's utter disbelief in those 



8i 

divers and many crimes charged against him such, for instance, 
as robbing hen-roosts, of stealing old clothes, of dealing cards 
unfairly in the national game of monte, of being a cheat, a vaga 
bond, Jew, and worst of all, a gringo. Poor old Judas stands this 
without a word of denial, and by standing mute is deemed to 
have pleaded guilty, is taken from the cart, raised to and bound 
on the gibbet. The crowd again commence to insult and pelt 
him, all of which old Judas endures without a word of remon 
strance; stands like a martyr. The tragedy is about to end as 
the shades of eve fall upon the scene. 

Now we hear the strains of martial music, the solemn tap of 
the drum, and the heavy tramp of military feet, as a platoon of 
infantry file into line and halt in front of the doomed traitor. 
Now the judgment of the court is read and the death warrant 
recited, and Judas is given an opportunity to speak for himself, 
but remains as mute as a dead mutton, which is taken as an 
acknowledgement that the judgment is just, and that he ought to 
die. Now the military commander orders his men to " load! 
shoulder arms! ready! aim! fire! " and poor Judas, for the eigh 
teen hundredth time or more suffers a public execution. The 
volley riddles him. Then "load and fire at will," and the sol 
diers take huge delight in firing at Judas until there is not a piece 
of him left large enough for a cigar wrapper. In the meantime 
the band plays, the crowd yell and hoot in triumphant glee, and 
Judas is sent to the devil until Saturday the year coming, when 
he is again disposed of in the same way. 

After the gringo nation had nailed its flag to the mast in this 
angel land, the ceremonies attending the annual execution of 
Judas became less inspiriting and satisfactory, because of there 
being no military to blow the old traitor into the next year. 

Some of the great ranchos of the country were baronial in their 
extent and surroundings. Their proprietors being great digni 
taries, maintaining large numbers of vassals for such really they 
were mostly Indians, who, under Mexican major-domos, did all 
of the labor for the ranch. The chief major-domo, under the 
immediate direction of the patron, had entire supervision of the 
business; then there was the major-domo de la casa, or steward; 
the major-domo del campo had charge of the vaqueros, or 
mounted herders in the field; the major-domo de las caponeras 
had full control of the gentle horses; the major-domo de las 
mandas was in charge of thousands of wild mares and their foals, 
6 



82 

and attended to the branding of colts, others to the marking and 
branding of cattle. There were hair-rope and halter makers, 
others who made cinches or broad hair girths, makers of raw 
hide riatas, the curers of hides, the triers out of tallow, the 
hewers of wood and the carreta men, all of whom amounted to 
hundreds of people dependent upon the ranchero or lord of the 
manor. At morn you hear the clatter of horses' feet and the 
jingling of spurs, as the mounted men, hat in hand, report for 
duty to the major-domo-in-chief, and then, in detachments, 
dash off at a full gallop in all directions to their respective 
duties. By this time coffee is served in the dining-hall, and the 
patron, members of his household, and guests take their morning 
cup. At nine or ten o'clock the vaqueros begin to return from 
the field, and a herd of gentle horses are driven into the corral, 
fresh ones are caught, and those of the day before are turned 
loose, maybe not to be used again for a week; the fresh ones are 
saddled, and then the under major-domos report to the chief, who 
in turn, hat in hand, reports to the patron, and then the whole 
ranch, goes to breakfast, which being disposed of, the duties of 
the day are resumed. 



[The following extract, taken from the work entitled " The Natural Wealth 
of California," by Titus Fey Cronise, published at San Francisco in 1868, 
twenty years subsequent to the disbandment of the regiment, thus speaks of 
the character established in later years by the former members of Col. Stevenson's 
regiment. It says:] 

" Another valuable accession to the early settlers was made by 
the arrival of Colonel Stevenson's Regiment of California volun 
teers, consisting of nearly one thousand rank and file, in anticipa 
tion of movements which were subsequently developed. In 1846 
President Polk authorized Colonel J. D. Stevenson to raise a 
regiment of infantry volunteers in New York, for the purpose of 
protecting the interests of the United States on the Pacific coast. 
The men comprising this regiment were selected particularly 
with the object of their becoming settlers in the country; many 
of them have become permanent and honored citizens of the 
State. In its ranks, as privates, were sons of senators and repre 
sentatives in Congress, lawyers, doctors, editors, printers, and 
representatives of nearly every trade, who were all permitted to 



83 

bring tools and material for carrying on their respective occupa 
tions being in striking contrast to the soldiers sent here by the 
Mexican Government, who were generally the worst convicts 
from the jails, and such refractory, turbulent characters as it was 
most desirable to get rid of. 

The California regiment left New York on the 26th of October* 
1846, on board the ships, " Thomas H. Perkins," " Loo Choo," 
and " Susan Drew." The first division, under command of Colonel 
Stevenson, on board the "Thomas H. Perkins," arrived at San 
Francisco March 6th, 1847. The regiment was mustered out of 
service in the summer of 1848. Nearly three hundred of its 
members were alive, in California, in July, 1867. Among its 
commissioned officers were Captain Folsom, Lieutenant Harrison 
and Captain Taylor, whose names are connected with streets 
formed on land they acquired. Captains H. M. Naglee and J. 
B. Frisbie held prominent positions in the history of the State. 
W. E. Shannon, the delegate from Sacramento to the State Con 
stitutional Convention, was Captain of Company I of this 
regiment. The volunteer service of the United States has been 
honored by the exemplary conduct of the members of Col. Stevenson s 
regiment" 



The following account of the explosion of the magazine at Los 
Angeles, Cal., is furnished by Col. John McH. Hollinsworth, from 
a journal kept by him while on duty at that post: 

" DECEMBER QTH, 1847. 

" The magazine has blown up and killed some of our brave 
fellows. We were informed by native Californians, friendly to 
our cause, that we should be attacked last night. Accordingly, 
every preparation was made to receive the enemy. When night 
came on I felt very anxious, and, though not on duty, and no 
responsibility resting upon me, yet I could not sleep. At mid 
night I put on my side arms, and, in company with Captain 
Stevenson, patroled the town. We met Sergeant Travers of 
the guard, one of my company, going around with a patrol, to 
see if all was right. He halted us, and, upon recognizing who 

* The author is in error the month was September. He also omits mention of the 
subsequent arrivals of ships " Brutus," " Isabella," and "Sweden," with detachments of the 
regiment. 



8 4 

we were, made the customary salute. I had not long returned to 
our quarters, when we heard the report of a musket from the 
furthermost outpost of the redoubt. Another report followed in 
rapid succession, and then a bright blaze lit up the heavens, fol 
lowed by a deafening roar, which seemed to come from the centre 
of our guard. Meanwhile we heard the drum rolling, and horses 
moving around our quarters. We armed ourselves, and passed 
out the back way, concluding we were surrounded, and must fight 
our way out. I opened the gate. No one was there; but I 
passed as rapidly and silently as I could along the shadow of the 
wall, to reach my company, for, as no one doubted but that the 
long expected attack had come. Horsemen were riding up and 
down the street in every direction. I looked back to see if any 
one was following, and found my Captain (Stevenson) next to 
me, with his broad, white belt passed across his shoulder and 
breast. I advised him to take it off instantly, unless he wished 
to be a target for the enemy's bullets. Upon reaching the com 
pany it pressed forward; we- were at the same moment joined by 
Captain Nelson Taylor and his men, and together we ran up the 
hill. All was still and dark when we set off, and we asked each 
other, 'Had the guard been overpowered? or had the ground 
been undermined and all blown into the air? ' As we neared the 
scefte of action, a spectacle presented itself which I hope never 
again to witness. The magazine had been opened to man the 
battery, when a spark from a port fire had fallen into it, through 
the carelessness of one of the men. The groans and shrieks of 
the wounded and dying, the shouting of the officers to the men, 
and the incessant roll of the drum, while everything was envel 
oped in a dense cloud of smoke, formed a terrible scene of con 
fusion. I heard the Colonel calling for me to take command of 
a party of soldiers who had already dug seven bodies out of the 
ruins. I hastily collected some men to convey the injured to the 
hospital. Three of them were burnt to a crisp, three burnt black, 
but with life still left, calling upon God to give them back their 
eyesight, which was gone forever It was thought at the time 
that at least twenty men were killed. All were knocked down 
who were near, though many were unharmed by it. The guard- 
chair, where I had so often sat, was shattered into a thousand 
atoms. The Lieutenant, although not in the chair at the time, 
was thrown some distance, but picked up unhurt. I saw a dra 
goon dug out from under the wall of the guard-house. He lived 



85 

but a few minutes. I heard one of the poor fellows calling for 
Lieut. H.; I went to him directly, and, though burnt black, I 
instantly recognized the poor Sergeant (Travers) I had met but 
an hour before. He said: * Lieutenant, tell me, as a man, can I 
live until morning? ' I told him I hoped to see him get well. 
One of the men said: ' The iron hinge of the magazine chest is 
driven into his body.' I said, 'Hush; do not alarm him.' The 
poor man said: ' Lieutenant, you cannot deceive me; I am mor 
tally wounded; I have lost my leg; my eyes are gone, all is dark 
to me. Oh, that my poor mother were here to pray for me! ' 
He then said: ' Doctor, I am sleepy; if I go to sleep will I wake 
again?' The doctor said, 'It is doubtful.' Travers then said: 
* Do not frighten my wife; tell her to be a good girl; I die 
content.' " 



[From the Daily Examiner (San Francisco), March 27th, 1872. 
TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY. 



STEVENSON'S REGIMENT REUNITED. 



The Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the landing of that famous 
body of pioneers, Stevenson's Regiment, was- celebrated last 
evening at Martin's Restaurant. The following survivors were 
present : Colonel Jonathan D. Stevenson. Co. A Frederick L. 
Post, John Flood, Joseph McDonough, James O'Sullivan, 
Edward Barthrop, J. P. Hawkins. Co. B James E. Nuttman, 
Patrick Lynch, James W. Melvin, Lieut. Thomas E. Ketchum. 
Co. C Adolphus G. Russ, A. J. Cox, James G. Dow. Co. D 
William S. Johnson, James Sirey, Frank P. Anderson, Charles 
Rosseau. Co. E Castor Briggs, Major John M. O'Neill, Ezekiel 
Bullock, Henry J. Wolgemuth. Co. F Sergeant James Queen, 
Emil A. Engelberg, Peter Sesser. Co. G James H. Adams, 
John Kleinschroth, Robert Wilson, Frederick Coyan. Co. H 
Captain John B. Frisbie, Sergeant Eleazar Frisbie, George N. 
Cornwall, Alfred Guthrie. Co. I George J. Graff. Co. K 
None. Dr. William C. Parker, Surgeon ; James C. L. Wads- 
worth, Clerk to Sutler ; John Q. Adams, " at Large." 



86 ' 

Letters were received from a number of absentees, expressing 
their regret at being unable to attend the re-union. The tables 
were well supplied, the wines excellent, and at a late hour the 
toasts came in and were responded to most happily. 

The Third toast, "The Army and Navy," was drank amid 
great enthusiasm. The band played the " Red, White and Blue." 

General Schofield, U. S. Army, commanding Department of 
the Pacific, responded. He said it afforded him great pleasure 
to meet the members of the pioneer regiment of California, and 
congratulate them upon their re-union. I am surprised, said he, 
to see so many of the gallant band together, after a lapse of 
twenty-five years, and so goodly a number of young men, too. I 
scarcely believe there is, among you, an older man than I am, 
and I am not yet twenty-five years in the service. It shows the 
character of our early soldiers, that they were men of vigor, of 
good habits and of good character. I assure you it gives me 
pleasure to witness the re-union of those who are of our early 
pioneers, and who have done so much to develop our country. 
I wish you many long years of prosperity. (Cheers.) 

" The Press " was the fifth regular toast. It was responded to 
by that venerable pioneer, Hon. Philip A. Roach, in a pertinent 
and happy speech. He returned thanks for the honor conferred, 
and* said that the subject could be better handled by younger 
members of the press present. He said, with your regiment, and 
as one of its number, a member of the press came to our shores, 
who established a free, fearless and independent paper in this 
city, and who was not afraid to speak out boldly. When it was 
dangerous to give utterance to his sentiments, he stood up for 
the people's rights, and by his fearless and brilliant character 
built up a paper of influence, talent and ability in this city the 
Alia. This gentleman's name, you well know, is Edward Gilbert, 
who laid down his life for what he believed were the principles 
of liberty we now enjoy and for the liberty of the press. His 
portrait very properly hangs in the Council Chamber of the city. 
He lost his life in maintaining his idea of what was right and 
combatting what was wrong. 

Mr. Roach's address was warmly received. A brother of Mr. 
Roach was a lieutenant in the regiment. 

The Volunteer toasts were happily proposed, and their responses 
in every instance full of kindly sentiment and good fellowship. 
At a late hour the re-union broke up. 



1 847 RE- UN ION AT NEW YORK 1874. 

The twenty-seventh anniversary of the landing of Stevenson's 
Regiment in California was celebrated by a dinner at the Sturte- 
vant House on the evening of the 26th of March, 1874. 

The following survivors were present: Surgeon Alex. Perry, 
Capt. James M. Turner, Lieut. Jeremiah Sherwood, James E. 
Nuttman, Russell Myers, William H. Christian, George M. 
Leonard, William H. Rogers, Jacob J. Schoonmaker, Francis D. 
Clark and John Taylor. 

Letters of regret were read from the following comrades: 
Major-General James A. Hardie, U. S. A., Gen. Nelson Taylor, 
Gen. Francis J. Lippitt, John Wolf, Esq. and Hon. Sherman O. 
Houghton, M. C. 

Among the many old Californians present were, Hon. C. K. 
Garrison, ex-Mayor of San Francisco, Gen. Thomas B. Van Buren, 
Gen. H. G. Gilson, U. S. A., James Stark, Esq. (the pioneer actor), 
and Major William W. Leland, (founder of the Pacific News at 
San Francisco in 1849). 



The New York Herald, in its issue of August 10, 1846, 
contains an engraving entitled " The Encampment of the 
California Regiment on Governor's Island," showing the regi 
ment on parade, and its issue of September 6 has another 
entitled " Presentation of Bibles to the New York Legion or 
California Regiment," on Governor's Island, by Rev. Dr. 
McVicar. 



[From the Albany Argus, August ist, 1846.] 

Yesterday Governor Wright issued commissions to the field 
officers of the Seventh Regiment of U. S. Volunteers from the 
State of New York, viz. : Jonathan D. Stevenson, Colonel ; 
Henry S. Burton, Lieutenant-Colonel ; James A. Hardie, 
Major. 



MUSTERED OUT IN 1873. 

To Lieutenant Jeremiah Sherwood of Company G, the honor 
belongs of having been the last officer holding a commission in a 
volunteer regiment enrolled for service during the Mexican war, 
to be mustered out of the service of the United States. Lieut. 
S., at the date of the discharge of Company G, at Los Angeles, 
Cal., September i8th, 1848, was absent upon detached service 
under Lieut. George Stoneman, U. S. Dragoons. Upon the 
news of the discharge of a portion of Stevenson's Regiment 
reaching Lieut. Stoneman, who was then in the neighborhood of 
San Francisco, he gave Lieut. Sherwood an indefinite furlough. 
Twenty-five years subsequent Lieut. Sherwood recalled this fact 
that he was still in the United States service; he addressed 
several communications to the War "Department on the subject, 
and after he had assured the Department that no claim for pay 
would be made upon the Government, was the least attention 
given to the communications. Then the Adjutant-General of the 
Army issued an order to Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, U. S. A., 
commanding the Military Division of the Atlantic, with Head 
quarters at New York, directing that officer to have Lieut. Sher 
wood properly mustered out of the service of the United States; 
and upon the muster-out roll of Company G, the War Depart 
ment has appended opposite to the name of Lieut. S., the follow 
ing in red ink: "A. G. O. Discharge furnished to date from 
September i8th, 1848, per Special Order 93, par. 3, Head 
quarters Military Division of the Atlantic, series of 1873." The 
remarks made by Capt. Smith, U. S. Dragoons, who mustered 
out the company at Los Angeles, opposite the name of Lieut. 
Sherwood being: "Absent on detached service by Special 
Order No. 40, Headquarters Southern Military District, Los 
Angeles." 



8 9 



CONCL USION. 

COMRADES: 

This publication was delayed some four months to enable addi 
tional facts regarding surviving, as also deceased comrades to be 
obtained, thereby affording the opportunity of recording herein 
information that must otherwise have been omitted. Every effort 
was used to learn who of those who are recorded under " where 
abouts unknown," were living or deceased. In some instances 
the result was favorable. Undoubtedly many others will be 
accounted for after this record refreshes the memory, by recall 
ing familiar names to those who were their associates in the 
regiment, or afterwards identified with them in civil life. 

Some twenty names have been received who are reported to 
have been members of the regiment, but as the official rolls of 
the respective companies fail to substantiate the fact, it is evident 
that some mistake has been made, in nearly every instance they 
are reported as deceased. 

Want of space has prevented the publication herein of 
communications written by our comrades, Captain Seymour G. 
Steele, Lieutenant John C. Bonnycastle, John B. Parvin, William 
H. Rogers and William H. Christain, containing interesting 
reminiscences relating to the old regiment. 

The printing, binding and distribution by mail of four hundred 
copies of this little volume necessitates an expense of over three 
hundred and fifty dollars, it being intended for private distribu 
tion among comrades, and through them to personal friends and 
relatives (excepting those copies which will be forwarded to 
historical and other societies in the Empire and the Golden State 
for preservation), the funds for the liquidation of this expense 
is derived solely from the voluntary contributions of survivors of 



9 



the old regiment, the small number of copies required greatly 
increased the cost of each book ; and, in response to my appeal 
for funds to defray this expense, it affords me pleasure to 
acknowledge the receipt of one half of the amount required from 
the following comrades : 

Colonel JONATHAN D. STEVENSON. 
Lieutenant J. C. BONNYCASTLE, Adjutant, 



Co. A. 

WILLIAM H. ROGERS. 
ANDREW J. MOORE. 
RUSSELL MYERS. 
WILLIAM H. WILLIAMS. 
JOHN W. THOMAS. 
WILLIAM WOOLEY. 
JOHN B. PARVIN. 
THEODORE R. SAUNDERS. 
MOSES W. PERRY. 

Co. B. 

Lieut. THOMAS E. KETCHUM. 
JAMES E. NUTTMAN. 
CHARLES H. THURSTON. 
CHARLES HEINRICH. 
SAMUEL CATTS. 

Co. D. 

WILLIAM S. JOHNSON. 
JAMES M. HARRON. 
JOHN WOLFE. 
GEORGE A. CORGAN. 
FRANCIS D. CLARK. 



Co. E. 

Capt. NELSON TAYLOR. 
JOHN M. O'NEIL. 
JOHN H. WELSH. 
GEORGE CANFIELD. 

Co. F. 

Capt. FRANCIS J. LIPPITT. 
CHAS. C. E. RUSS. 
JAMES LYNCH. 
AUGUST E. ENGELBERG. 
AMISON WHITAKER. 

Co. G. 

Lieut. JEREMIAH SHERWOOD. 
" J. McH. ROLLINGS WORTH. 
ROBERT WILSON. 
E. D. SHIRLAND. 
THOMAS NISBITT. 

Co. H. 

Capt. JOHN B. FRISBIE. 

SQUIRE G. MERRILL. 
GEORGE VAN VECHTEN. 
JAMES H. LAPPEUS. 



Co. I. 



JOSEPH EVANS. 



EUGENE GUIBAL. 



9 1 

The Legislature of the State of New York has recently passed 
an act appropriating the sum of fifty thousand dollars for the 
purpose of granting to each survivor of the First Regiment of 
New York Volunteers, which served in the Mexican war, the sum 
of twelve dollars per month for a period of two years. The act 
only awaits at this date, (June ist, 1882,) the signature of the 
Governor to become a law. At the first glance it would be sup 
posed that this allowance was for the survivors of the regiment 
under. Colonel Jonathan D. Stevenson. Such is not the fact. 

Disputes having arisen, and more or less confusion still exist 
ing in the minds of many, with reference to the proper designation 
of our regiment, it seems not inappropriate to here state a few 
facts, giving a clear and better understanding of the matter. 

At the outbreak of the Mexican war an attempt was made to 
organize six regiments in the State of New York, and while these 
were in the course of completion the War Department issued 
authority to Colonel Jonathan D. Stevenson to organize a regi 
ment in the State of New York for service in California, and 
naturally, this latter regiment took the designation of "Seventh 
Regiment New York Volunteers," under which title it was mus 
tered into the service, and took its departure for its field of duty. 
The effort to organize the six regiments, above referred to, was, 
subsequent to the sailing of the regiment under Col. Stevenson 
for California, abandoned, owing to the fact that the War Depart 
ment declined to accept only one other regiment from the State 
of New York for duty in Mexico. Out of these six partly organ 
ized regiments, owing to a compromise made between several of 
the would-be colonels, was formed the regiment which served in 
Mexico under the command of Colonel Ward B. Burnett, which 
was the second and last New York regiment organized and mus 
tered into the service of the United States during the Mexican 
war. Colonel Stevenson's regiment having been mustered into 
the service as the Seventh, and having sailed for California, the 
State authorities designated the regiment under Colonel Burnett 
the First. 

The War Department subsequently corrected this erroneous 
designation of New York regiments, by an order directing Col. 
Stevenson to thereafter designate and muster his regiment as the 
" First Regiment of New York Volunteers," which order, upon its 
receipt by Col. Stevenson at Los Angeles, Cal., early in 1848, 
through Col. R. B. Mason, ist U. S. Dragoons, commanding in 



9 2 

California was immediately complied with. An order was also 
issued by the War Department and forwarded to Col. Burnett, 
through the headquarters of Gen. Winfield Scott, commanding 
the U. S. Army in Mexico, directing Colonel B. to thereafter 
designate and muster his regiment as the " Second Regiment of 
New York Volunteers." Col. Burnett, in an interview with the 
writer in the Fall of 1873, gave the following as his reason for 
declining to obey the order: 

Col. B. said: "An order was received from Gen. Winfield 
Scott, commanding the Armies of the United States in Mexico, 
directing me to discontinue mustering my regiment as the First, 
and returning the rolls for correction. I maintained that by so 
doing I would invalidate my commission, received from the 
Governor of the State of New York, by which I was designated 
Colonel of the First Regiment of New York Volunteers, under 
which designation it was mustered into the service of the United 
States, and that only under the authority of the State of New 
York could the designation of my regiment be changed." 

Col. B. was, however, required thereafter to muster his regiment 
upon the muster rolls as the Second. Col. Stevenson, on the con 
trary, who held his commission under the same authority, never 
questioned the right of the Government to change the designation 
of his regiment from that of the Seventh to the First. 

Col. B. still holds to the disputed title, and on all public occa 
sions or parades in the City of New York the survivors of his 
regiment floats at their head a flag upon which is inscribed : " First 
Regiment of New York Volunteers, Mexican war Col. Ward B. 
Burnett." 

Not a member of the regiment under the command of Colonel 
Jonathan D. Stevenson, from the State of New York, in the Mex 
ican war, would deprive the members of Colonel Ward B. Burnett's 
regiment of one iota of the glory they so nobly achieved upon 
many well fought battle fields in the valley of Mexico. To the 
contrary, the members of Col. Stevenson's regiment are proud of 
the record gained in Mexico by their brother New York regiment; 
but the confusion that continually arises through the same desig 
nation to both regiments ought not to exist. The members of 
Col. Stevenson's regiment have never received nor asked for any 
special favor from the National, or any State Government, while 
the present is the second instance in which the State of New York 
has granted to the members of the regiment under Col. Burnett 



93 

a gratuity; and yet the survivors of Col. Stevenson's regiment 
are none the less soldiers of the Empire State who went forth 
under her banner for service in the Mexican war. 

The following letter, received from the War Department, is 
evidence that Col. Stevenson's regiment is recognized in that 
office as the First : 

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, 
WASHINGTON, November 18, 1881. 

FRANCIS D. CLARK, ESQ., 

38 Cortlandfr street, New York City. 

SIR In reply to your several letters, addressed to the Secretary 
of War, the General of the Army, and to General Lippitt, of the 
Department of Justice, I respectfully transmit herewith skeleton 
copies of the muster out rolls of the First Regiment of New York 
Volunteers, Mexican War. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. C. CORBIN, 

Asst. Adjutant General. 

Letters having been received from comrades who are now 
residents of the Atlantic States expressing a wish that arrange 
ments might be effected for a re-union, in the near future, of 
survivors of the old command at New York. The suggestions 
were submitted to comrades residing in the City of New York, 
and met with a favorable response, accordingly a call will be 
issued inviting those comrades who can possibly attend to 
assemble in the City of New York, on Tuesday, the 26th day of 
September next, the Thirty-sixth Anniversary of the sailing of 
the regiment from this port bound for California, upon which 
occasion a dinner will be given by the New York survivors to 
their visiting comrades from neighboring cities. The suggestion 
is therefore made that our surviving comrades at San Francisco 
might also inaugurate a movement for a re-union upon the same 
date in that city among whom they have our old and venerable 
colonel, to whom such a meeting would without doubt prove of 
the greatest possible pleasure. Let all, therefore, who possibly 
can, make the 26th day of September next a joyous day for the 
survivors of the old regiment. A few years hence our roll will 
undoubtedly be greatly diminished. 



94 

I am persuaded to recall these words, "with this publication I 
bring my labors to a close," which appear in my introductory 
remarks, feeling that the labor of the past eleven years should 
not close until at least one more effort was made to learn who of 
those under "Whereabouts unknown" are living or deceased, 
and, within a few months after this little waif reaches our com 
rades, information ought to be received that will unravel the 
mystery surrounding those names, all are therefore asked to fur 
nish such facts in relation thereto as a refreshed memory will 
permit, which facts will be compiled in a circular sheet and for 
warded to comrades, thereby forming arf appendix to the present 
issue. Let the information that is furnished be positive. 

To those comrades from whom letters of encouragement have 
been received within the past few months, expressive of their 
thanks and satisfaction at the effort being made through my 
humble labors to once more re-unite old acquaintances, I can 
only reiterate, the labor was one of pleasure and love. The 
action of those comrades whose names appear on folio 90 is con 
clusive that those labors are appreciated. What greater reward 
than those kindly expressions for such humble efforts could be 
asked for a self-imposed duty ? With the hope that the result 
will contribute an hour of pleasant reflection to those who were 
my associates on the Pacific Coast in years ante-dating " The 
days of old, the days of gold, the days of '49." 

Fraternally yours, 

FRANCIS D. CLARK. 

No. 38 Cortlandt Street, 
NEW YORK, June ist, 1882. 



APPENDIX 



CONTAINING ADDITIONAL NAMES OF SURVIVORS REPORTED 
SINCE THE ISSUE OF THE VOLUME, JUNE IST, 1882; 
DEATHS OF COMRADES DURING THE PAST THIR 
TEEN MONTHS ; FURTHER INFORMATION 
RELATIVE TO DEATHS REGISTERED IN 
THE VOLUME, AND NAMES REPORT 
ED WHICH DO NOT APPEAR 
ON THE OFFICIAL ROLLS 
OF THE REGIMENT. 

ALSO, 

NAMES OF THE CONTRIBUTORS TO THE PUBLICATION FUND, 
EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS RECEIVED FROM COM 
RADES AND OTHERS IN COMMENDATION 
OF "THE LITTLE VOLUME," 
ETC., ETC., ETC. 

New York, August ist, 1883. 



COMRADES: 

With the few pages comprising the Appendix to this little 
volume, the labor of years in the interest of our old regiment 
and its survivors, are brought to a close. Those of you who 
have aided in this work, either through information furnished or 
money contributed, have the satisfaction of feeling that the sur 
vivors of the regiment have been benefited thereby, for through 
that assistance the little volume has been published, and placed 
in the hands of every known survivor. My own labor and exer 
tions have been a pleasure, and I feel grateful for the expressions 
of satisfaction and friendliness conveyed in over one hundred 
letters received from members of the old regiment. If a line has 
crept into the little book calculated to give offense to any one of 
my comrades, it was through oversight on^my part. Certainly, 
I would not at this late day wound the feelings of any member of 
the old command. 

In bringing my labors to a close, permit me to express the 
hope that our surviving comrades may not again become so 
estranged from each other as I found them in 1870, when the 
task was assumed of searching out their whereabouts; for cer 
tainly, at that date, few of us were aware of the existence or 
place of residence of ten other comrades. Let us ever bear in 
remembrance the pleasant and happy reminiscences of the days 
we passed in the old organization, the majority of us being at 
that time mere youths.' At this date, with a few individual 
exceptions, we remember each other only as we appeared in 
early life. May we cherish our early friendship, and always 
honor the name of our respected and venerable Colonel, whose 
life God still spares, and who, although now past the allotted 
four-score, is still in the enjoyment of vigorous health, and in 
the pursuit of his daily labors as an honored servant of the 
Government, and a creditable citizen of California. 



The organization of our survivors into a society is impractic 
able, from the fact that our places of abode are so far apart. 
Yet where there are a sufficient number in any one locality, they 
can at least form themselves into a brotherhood, and once each 
year spread their board with Tortillas, Frijoles and Carni-Seco, 
and pass a few hours in social converse. 

Though our Government still neglects its duty to the aged and 
infirm " Veterans of the Mexican War," men, who in the fulfil 
ment of their contract rendered faithful and honorable service in 
that which gave honor, wealth and territory to the country let 
us hope that their claims may yet be favorably considered by 
Congress, and the pension which they have so long appealed for 
be granted. Of our regiment, perhaps, there is a less number of 
survivors in need of this aid than there is of any other in the 
service during that war, yet even among our own comrades there 
are those who would be greatly benefited by such help from the 
Government in their declining years. 

The present is, in all probability, the last attempt I shall make 
to issue a printed list of the survivors of our old regiment; still, it 
is not my purpose to discontinue the record of deaths as they may 
occur, if apprised thereof. Having completed an almost accu 
rate record of the living, I ask to be informed of any change 
that may occur among our members by death or otherwise. 

Fraternally, &c., 

FRANCIS D. CLARK, 

Formerly of Co. D. 



No. 38 CORTLAND STREET, 

NEW YORK, August ist, 1883. 



SU^UIUOFJS. 



*GALLAGHER, JOHN 
WEISS, WILLIAM 



0. 



*CHIPMAN, WALTER 
IR WIN, EDWARD 
*T AIT, JAMES A. 



Cedar Springs, Kent Co., Mich. 

Middleton, Lake Co., Cal. 

Santa Cruz, Cal. 



0. "B." 



Bodega Corner, Sonoma Co., Cal. 
San Francisco. 



010. 

*LIEUT. THERON R. PER LEE . , 
ZETSCHSKY, CHARLES 

010. 
*JANES, ALDEN W 

0. 

*BAXTER, WILLIAM O. 

010. 

LOPEZ. THEODORE 

*MILFORD, EDMUND N. 



<. 



Baltimore, Md. 
Petaluma, Cal. 



Kenton, Hardin Co., Ohio. 



Santa Monica, Cal. 



Sonora, Toulumne Co., Cal. 
Princeton, Mariposa Co., Cal. 



*GROW, WILLIAM ........ Dead wood, Dakota Ter. 

GEHRINGER, ANDREW ...... Concord, Contra Costa Co ., Cal. 

010. "3. " 

LUKER, WILLIAM ........ Sonora, Tuolumne Co., Cal. 

0. "K. " 

FRINK, DANIEL ...... Mountain View, Santa Clara Co. , Cal. 

*LEACH, KENDRICK N ..... Fountain Green, Hancock Co., 111. 

Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



LO VEL AND, CYRUS C 



Sana. 



DUNITCH, ERNEST F ..... . . . . near Placerville, Cal. 

*HAUFF, ERNEST ...... Yorkville, Mendocino Co. , Cal . 

* Information direct from themselves. 



Dfl&F)S 1882 AND '83. 



0. "<2t." 

LEWIS, JOSEPH B. . . . . Fort Davis, Texas, June 24, 1882 

BOUCHALTZ, THEODORE .. near Mariposa, Cal., PJune 11, 1883^ 

0. "ID." 

ATKINSON, CHARLES A Mariposa, Cal., August 7, 1882. 

HILL, JOHN EVANS . . . . Pendelton, Oregon, August 6,1882. 

SCHREADOR, GEORGE . . . . Napa Co., Cal., Sept. 20, 1882. 

010, "Cfifr." 

LIEUT. JEREMIAH SHERWOOD, . . New York City, March 14, 1883. 

" 010. JL" 

OSGOOD, HENRY M San Luis Obispo, Cal., Dec. 9, 1882. 

GUIBAL, EUGENE Gilroy, Cal., 1883. 

010. "E." 

MERRITT, ROBERT G Ukiah, Mendocino Co., March 27, 1883. 



Additional information received Deaths. 

0. "&." 

BURKE, JAMES on Stanislaus river, , 1851. 

DENKERS, CHARLES W. . . at Sacramento, May 4, 1871. 

HATHAWAY, JAMES M at Downieville, Sierra Co., , 1851, 

HAMILTON, JAMES . . at Jackson, Amador Co., , 1858. v 

MORTON, FREEMAN at Stockton, Cal., ,185-. 

MORSE, HENRY on San Joaquin Plains, , 1849, 

MURRAY, EDWARD in Calaveras Co., , 1855, 

PENROSE, LIEUT. GEO. F at Monterey, Cal., , 185-. 

PEASLEY, NESMITH H. .. .. .. at San Francisco, ,1851. 

SCHOONMAKER, MILTON C. . . at Stockton, Cal., Jan'y , 1850. 

SCHILLER, EDWARD . . . . . . at , Texas, , 1881. 

TAIT, WILLIAM G at , NIC., ,185-. 

TIPSON, WILLIAM H at San Francisco, Dec. 7, 1867.V 

0. "8." 

BRADY, JOHN R. at Stockton, Cal., ,185-. 

FITCH, WORTHINGTON L at San Francisco, , 1850. 



OGDEN, BENJAMIN .. 
PECK, CHARLES L. 
RYAN, EDWARD 
RANDALL, CHARLES G. 
RICHARDSON, CHARLES 
SCOTT, CHARLES G. 
TOWNER, LOAMMI . . 
WALL, RICHARD . 



. . at Brooklyn, N. Y., Nov. , 1866. 

at Monterey, Cal., , 1854 V 

. . at San Francisco, , 1866 N 

at San Jose, Cal., , 185-.\ 

at sea, brig " Vesta," , 1855x 

at , Nic., , 185-x 

. . at San Jose, Cal. , 185-.* 

at Linden, San Joaquin Co., , 185-.^ 



oi0. "or." 

LAYDEN, WILLIAM at Sandwich Islands, 



REASSEAU, CHARLES 
WILSON, JOHN 
WARRINGTON, JOHN 



010. " SD." 

at San Francisco, 
at Firebaughs Ferry, Cal., 
at Indian Reservation, Mendocino Co. 



185-. 



1868.- 

1870. 

-185-. 



010. 

CAMPBELL, JAMES T. 

KIERNAN, JOHN B 

LEGARE, BURNETT 
McPHERSON, GEORGE 
McMANUS, JAMES 

MCMILLAN, CHARLES .. 
MORTON, HENRY S. 
VERMULE, LIEUT. THOMAS L. 

MILLIKEN, JOHN 

HUTCHEON, WALTER .. 

VAN RIPER, ABRAHAM (Sergt.)on 



"<." 

. . at San Francisco, , 1853. 

at Stockton, Cal. , , 186-x 

at Sea, . 1866. 

at Morrisania, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1869. 

. . at San Francisco, , 1852^ 

, 186-, v 

. . at Stockton, Cal., , 1854_ 

. . at Stockton, Cal., May 7, 1856. 

at Santa Clara Co. (about), 1878. v 
at Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 15, 1880. 
Mokeluinne River, Winter of 1848-'49.- 



010. 



CARPENTER, CHARLES R. 
GALUSHA, ELON A. . . 
MASON. ALFRED 
MULVEY, JAMES 

PULIS, JOHN C 

POWER, EDWARD . . 
POWER, JOHN A 

SMITH, JAMES G. 



at Havana, Cuba, - 

at Rochester, N. Y., 

. . at Sacramento, 

at San Francisco, - 



at Sonora, Mexico, 



1860. 
, 18-. 
, 18-. 
1865. 
1850 



I860: 



j Drowned at 
Cal. 



STEPHENS, PETER, 
VIDAL, JOHN A. 



Middle Fork of the American River, 

1849. 

at San Francisco, , 1849.- 

at Santa Barbara. , 1853,, 



FARR, PHILIP 
TOYE, H. H. F. 



010. " 



at Dutch Flat, Cal., , 18. 

at Granada, Nic., , 1856. 



DAVIS, BENJAMIN B at Merced, Cal. , , 1880. 

LEDDY, MICHAEL Mendocino County, ,18-. 

VEDDER, PETER G at Manaque, Nic., ,1856. 

WIERZBICKIE, FELIX P at San Francisco, Dec. 25, 1860. . 

0. "J." 

KELLY, PHILIP .. .. .. .. in Calaveras Co. , ,1860. 

010. "." 

DIMMICK, CAPT. K. H at Los Angeles, Sept. 11, 1861.' 

GRAMS, PHILIP at Milwaukee, Wis., ,1880. 

tUgitnental JJano. 

FAUFTER, JOHANN . . . . at Washington, D. C., , 1864. 

Sutler. 

HAIGHT, SAMUEL W. at San Francisco, Feb. 27, 1856. 



ERRATA. (SEE VOLUME.) 

Folio 22 CAPT. J. L. FOLSOM, read . . . . 19th instead of 15th. 

22 ROBERT MURRAY, Assistant Surgeon, U. S. A., was not an 
an officer of the regiment, but served at various posts in Cali 
fornia, garrisoned by the regiment. His present rank is Col 
onel and Assistant Surgeon-General, U. S. A. Stationed at 
Fort Columbus, Governor's Island, staff of Gen. W. S. Han 
cock, U. S. A. 

" 25 CHARLES W. DENKERS, .. See deaths in Appendix. 

" 26- THEODORE BONCHALTZ, read THEODORE BOUCHALTZ. 

" 28 JAMES DRENNER, read .. .. JAMES DRENNEN. 

" 31 ARTEMUS RICHARDSON, read Sonora, Tuolumne Co. 

" 33 CHARLES REASSEAU, . . See deaths in Appendix. 

11 33 JAMES M. HARRON, read .. .. JAMES HARRON. 

34 ALDEN W. JAMES, read .. .. ALDEN W. JANES. 

" 34 GEORGE SCHRAELOR, read .. GEORGE SCHREADOR. 

" 39 JAMES DOULEVY, read . . . . JAMES DONLEVY. 

" 44 JAMES F. GORDWELL, read . . JAMES F. GOOD WELL. 

" 48 FREDERICK N. LEACH, read KENDRICK N. LEACH. 



Names reported which do not appear on the official roll of the 
regiment. Some of the members of the regiment enlisted under 
assumed names to avoid discovery by parents and guardians, and 
resumed their proper names upon the discharge of the regiment 
in 1848. This may account for some of these names reported. 



BROWN, WILLIAM H. 
BRUEN, JOHN H. 
BENSON, CHRISTIAN 
CONLEY, MARSTON F. 
CUNNINGHAM, STEPHEN 
CASSEL, JOHN 
CHRISTIAN, CHARLES 
DAY, EDWARD 
FORD, HENRY 
HAWKINS, JOHN A. 
HOFFMAN, CHARLES 
HEATHCOAT, - 
HARRISON, LIEUT. EDW. H, 
KORN, JULIUS 



KORNISH, 



McDUFF, A. JACKSON 

MCDONALD, CHARLES 

McGLOENE, JAMES 

McLEOD, ALEXANDER 

O'GRADY, 

PARSONS, J. H 

RAND, GEORGE 

SMITH JOHN G. (James G. in 

Co. F.) 

WALTER, JOHN 
YETCH, AUGUST 



Information received of Comrades. 



Co. A.- 

" K.- 

" A.- 

" B.- 

<l D.- 

" E.- 

" E.- 

" G.- 

" G.- 

- I.- 



-PENNY, MOSES H. .. 
-MAC KAY, JOHN H. 
-NOYES, MICHAEL S. 
-WHITE, CRISTOPHER S. 
-CAHN, PHILIP V. 
-HAMLEN, MORTIMER J. 
-BURTON, JAMES C. 
-EDMONSON, ALFRED 
-TAYLOR : WALTER 
-BROOKS, EDWARD J. 
P. S. The effort made to verify 



Went to Chili, S. C., in 1850. 
f San Francisco, Cal. 

Union ville,Humboldt Co., Nev. 

Silver City, Lyon Co. , Idaho. 

Oakland, Cal. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Corpus Christie, Texas. 
[Muscogee, Creek Nation, I. T. 
the above ivas unsuccessful. 



Survivors of the 100 members of the regiment that arrived in 
California by the transport " Isabella," under Lieut. Thomas J. 
Roach: 

LIPP, CARLOS 

NORRIS, JACOB W. 

PHILLIPS, JOHN B. 

RUSS, C. C. E. 

SIMS, JOSEPH 

THOMAS, JOHN W. 

TAIT, JAMES A. 

TOOMBS, GEORGE W. 



AMES, JOSIAH-P. 
CORGAN, GEORGE A. 
CHANDLER, JOHN A. 
CLARK, FRANCIS D. 
CLAMP, RICHARD 
FARLEY, GEORGE 
FARLEY, THOMAS P. 
HAVEY, JOHN 
JANES, ALDEN W. 



WILLIAMS, WILLIAM H. 



10 



CONTRIBUTORS TO THE PUBLICATION FUND. 

FIELD AND STAFF, $25. 

COL. J. D. STEVENSON. CAPT. W. G. MARCY, Commissary. 

LIEUT. J. C. BONNYCASTLE, Adjutant. 



Co. A $18. 

EDWARD BARTHROP, 
RUSSELL MYERS, 
JOHN B. PARVIN, 
MOSES W. PERRY, 
WILLIAM H. ROGERS, 
JOHN SCOLLAN, 
JAMES THOMPSON, 
JOHN W. THOMAS, 
WILLIAM WOOLEY, 
WILLIAM H. WILLIAMS. 

Co. B $24. 

LIEUT. THOS. E. KETCHUM 
JOSIAH P. AMES, 
SAMUEL CATTS, 
CHARLES HEINRICH, 
ANDREW J. MOORE, 
CHARLES H. THURSTON. 

Co. C $15. 

LIEUT. THERON R. PER LEE, 
ADOLPH P. RUSS. 

Co. D $33. 

GEORGE A. CORGAN, 
GEORGE C. DEAN, 
JAMES HARRON, 
WILLIAM S. JOHNSON, 
ALDEN W. JANES, 
JACOB W. NORRIS, 
WILLIAM. D. ROBINSON, 
JOSEPH SIMS, 
JOHN WOLFE, 
ALPHIAS YOUNG. 

Co. E $26. 

CAPT. NELSON TAYLOR, 
LIEUT. EDWARD WILLIAMS. 
WILLIAM BAXTER, 



WILLIAM BOYERS, 
GEORGE CANFIELD, 
ISAAC C. JOHNSON, 
JOHN M. O'NEIL, 
JOHN H. WELSH. 

Co. F $33. 

CAPT. FRANCIS J. LIPPITT, 
AUGUST ENGELBERG, 
JAMES LYNCH, 
AUGUST RUSS, 
C. C. E. RUSS, 
AMISON WH1TAKER. 

Co. G $37. 

LIEUT. J. Me. H. ROLLINGS- 

WORTH, 

LIEUT. J. SHERWOOD, 
THOMAS NISBITT, 
E. D. SHIRLAND, 
ADOLPH PFIESTER, 
ROBERT WILSON. 

Co. H $28. 

CAPT. JOHN B. FRISBIE, 
JAMES A. LAPPEU1S, 
SQUIRE G. MERRILL, 
GEORGE VAN VECHTEN. 

Co. I $24. 

JOSEPH EVANS, 
JOHN C. EMERSON, 
EUGENE GUIBAL. 
H. M. OSGOOD, 
ELIJAH M. SMITH, 
CORNELIUS SULLIVAN, 
ANDREW J. WARD. 

Co. K. 



1 1 



NON-MEMBERS OF REGIMENT $26. 
JOHN Q. ADAMS, BENJ. W. JENXESS, 



THEODORE RUSS, 
W. C. OSBORNE, 



HON. PHILIP A. ROACH, 
C. A. MARTELLS. 



While it would have afforded great pleasure to have made 
special mention of those comrades who so generously came to 
the aid and assistance of the publication fund, I abstain from 
so doing, feeling that many who contributed gave to the extent 
of their ability, and that a discrimination would be unjust to 
those," who, while their means were limited, yet cheerfully gave 
of that little, when other comrades, with ample means, declined or 
neglected to contribute. The total expense that will have been in 
curred with the issue of the Appendix amounts to $400 ; of this 
amount $290 has been received as follows: One contributed $20, 
eight $10 each, one $7, twenty-four $5 each, four $3 each, four 
$2.50 z&c\\, fourteen $2 each, and thirteen i each. 

To provide for the deficiency, copies of this volume, with the 
Appendix bound therein, will be furnished at 2 each, or three 
copies for $5. Those who have contributed to the publication 
fund will receive the Appendix sheets (which are uniform with 
those in the volume) free of charge. 



WHAT IS SAID OF THE "LITTLE VOLUME." 

" WASHINGTON, D. C., July i, 1882. 

" I thank you truly for the handsome volume, entitled, ' The First Regi 
ment of Xew York Vols., 1846-1882,' compiled and issued by you. Few of 
the men who composed that regiment are living to appreciate the graceful trib 
ute to their memory, but they left families and hosts of friends who will be 
delighted to possess in a small compass so many names, and the history of so 
many events with which that regiment was associated. In casting my eyes over 
the volume I find names that were once familiar, and am reminded of things lost 
to all but memory. I congratulate you on your success, and beg to subscribe 
myself as one of your friends." W. T. SHERMAN, General. 

" Your valuable work came duly to hand, and I am really delighted with its 
neatness and beauty of finish. Its contents are just what they should be. Ac 
cept my thanks for the courtesy and kind attention you have ever shown your 
old commander, and believe me, most sincerely and truly, your friend," 

J. D. STEVENSON, Colonel (of the Regiment). 



" Your book has given me great pleasure, and I am thankful to you for all 
the labor and trouble you have expended on the records of our old regiment : 
Many familiar names come to my mind again from thirty-five years ago. It 
a very nice book to hand over to our children when we are called away." 

A. PFIESTER, Co. G. 



12 



" I am much pleased with the external of the book; its neat and attractive 
-appearance commends itself. With regard to its contents, I think those in 
sympathy with your undertaking have good reason to be more than satisfied. 
for you have given them more than they expected. Its arrangement is 
admirable, and the object you had in mind in its production is well and 
fully covered, and in good taste. 

" I know you have spent a great deal of labor and thought in its prepara 
tion and production, but feel assured that you will consider yourself well paid 
for the labor and time expended, in the congratulation of friends, and the faVor 
I am confident it will be received by our comrades of the old regiment." 

NELSON TAYLOR, Capt. Co. E. 



" A more welcome book has never made its appearance in my house, not 
only to myself, but my family." JAMES LYNCH, Co. F. 



' ' Your little volume relating to our old regiment is to hand. I am much 
pleased with it. Only for your zeal and devotion we would have passed into 
oblivion. I shall treasure it as an heir-loom for my two orphan grand 
daughters." JOHN SCOLLAN, Co. A. 

" CITY OF MEXICO, Nov. 22, 1882. 

" It affords me much pleasure to have an opportunity of expressing my high 
appreciation of the service you have rendered to your old comrades in thus pre 
serving the memory of our regiment. " JOHN B. FRISBIE, Capt. Co. H. 



"I have your beautiful book relating to our old regiment. The great 
labor which you must have given the subject is worthy of the highest reward 
your old comrades can bestow." WILLIAM C. PARKER, Ass't Surgeon. 



" The thanks of this Society are tendered Mr. Francis D. Clark, for a copy 
of his work, which we highly appreciate." JOHN C. ROBINSON, Sec'y, 

Associated Veterans of the Mexican IVar, San Francisco. 



" Your little volume reads to me like a roll-call, and carries my thoughts 
back thirty-six years, when the most of us were mere youths, among whom I re 
member you well." GEORGE CANFIELD, Co. E. 

" I have read with deep interest your book, and you deserve much credit for 
energy and perseverance in getting it up, and I can thoroughly appreciate the 
difficulties under which you labored in order to avoid giving offense to any one." 

J. McH. HOLLINGSWORTH, Lieut. Co. G- 



" A very creditable work, and affords me great satisfaction in accounting for 
many of my old comrades, of whom, while I regret the dead, am glad to see 
so many are certainly alive." . JOHN C. BONNYCASTLE, Lieut, and Adjt. 



" It is a valuable work, and splendidly gotten up." 

PHILIP A. ROACH, of San Francisco. 



" The book is exceedingly creditable in every respect." 

SEYMOUR G. STEELE (Captain), Co. A. 

" The book is very valuable, and I will treasure it as a keepsake of old days 
never to be forgotten." GEORGE VAN VECHTEN, Co. H. 

"We all owe you a debt for your labor and perseverance. Accept my 
heartfelt thanks." ANDREW J. MOORE, Co. A. 

"I cannot refrain from congratulating you on its very handsome typo 
graphical and general appearance, not to speak of its valuable information." 

JOHN C. EMERSON, Co. I. 

" I am intensely pleased, and prize it highly. The survivors owe you a debt 
of gratitude." JOHN B. PARVIN, Co. A. 

"Just the information I most desired." E. D. SHIRLAND, Co. G. 

" The book is admirable in make up, and is an interesting and valuable 
record. Your enterprise is creditable, and a gracious tribute to the veterans." 
JOHN Q. ADAMS, son of JAMES H. ADAMS, Co. G. 



" You deserve great credit and thanks for the zeal displayed in our behalf. 
I very much doubt if any other man would have undertaken to perpetuate the 
memories of the dear old regiment." SQUIRE G. MERRILL, Co. H. 



" I am instructed to convey to you the thanks of this Society for your gift, 
as also to assure you of its appreciation of your valuable work, and the gratitude 
expressed by many at its compilation." WILLIAM G. FREEMAN, Sec'y, 

San Joaqnin Society of California Pioneers, Stockton, Cal. 

" Many thanks for your efforts in furnishing the valuable information your 
work contains. It afforded me a rich treat in renewing my memory of old times 
and the boys of '46-'4S, of which by far the greater proportion are enrolled with 
the silent majority. " GEO. N. CORNWELL, Co. H. 

"I am satisfied that every one connected with the regiment owes you a vol 
ume of thanks, and I hasten to return you mine." J. C. L. WADSWORTH. 



" I am highly pleased, and feel thankful to you for the publication of such a 
splendid work." JAMES H. ADAMS, Co. G. 

The following letter, received from a comrade, shows that 
the old time feeling of generosity has not departed from the 
early pioneers of California, which, under the circumstances, is a 
liberal offering: 
FRIEND CLARK, New York City: TUCSON, ARIZONA, Feb. 25, 1883. 

Enclosed please find P. O. order for three dollars to help defray the 
expense of printing the handsome volume received. Not being rich, I am 
obliged to labor for my daily bread, so cannot do better for you. 

M. W. PERRY, Co. A. 



1848.1 REUNION AT NEW YORK. [1882. 

Wednesday Evening, Oct. 24, 1882. 

Thirty-fourth anniversary of the discharge of the last company 
(D) of the regiment from service at Monterey, Cal. 

The following account of the gathering of survivors of Steven 
son's California Expedition on the above evening, is taken from 
the New York Herald, of the following morning : 

MEXICAN WAR VETERANS. 

ANNIVERSARY DINNER OF THE MEN WHO ANTIDATE THE FORTY-NINERS. 

Each one of a company of gentlemen who sat down last evening to dinner at 
Martinelli's wore a little gold figure of a bear on his breast. This is an insignia 
worn only by pioneers who preceded the Forty-niners to California. The party 
of diners were the veterans of the First regiment of New York Volunteers of 
the Mexican war. The regiment was raised by order of President Polk, with 
orders to proceed to California by the then only method around Cape Horn. 
Colonel Jonathan D. Stevenson was placed in command, and the instructions of 
the regiment were to take possession of the Mexican province of California and 
hold it. President Polk, looking to the future benefit of the province, gave in 
structions that the material of the regiment should be carefully chosen and as 
far as possible should consist of young unmarried men with trades. There was 
quite a competition to get into the regiment, and many of the best families of 
this State were represented in the thousand men and officers who set sail on 
September 26, 1846, in the transports Thomas H. Perkins, Loo Choo, Susan 
Drew and other craft. The trip was a long and eventful one, the entire winter 
of 1846-7 being spent in making the voyage. The several South American 
ports were stopped at, and some very remarkable pranks were played by the 
young soldier lads. There were a few lives lost by heavy storms about Cape 
Horn, bi\t the vessels arrived at San Francisco in good shape in March, 1847. 
The bulk of the work of conquering the province had already been accomplished 
by the naval forces, but the regiment found plenty to do in keeping order and 
in performing garrison duty; and it was not until October 24, 1848, that the 
last wing of the regiment was disbanded and the several members settled down 
to civil avocations. 

The discovery of gold brought .en the rush of fortune-seekers. These later 
comers wear the badge of the silver bear, and proudly refer to themselves as 
pioneers; but the First regiment veterans were already on the spot. 

AROUND THE FESTIVE BOARD. 

The dinner last evening was held on the date of the disbandment of the 
command, and was attended by such of the old members as had drifted back in 
the course of years to New York. Among those present were William H. 
Rogers, Russell Myers and William H. Williams, of Company A; James E. 
Nuttman and Charles J. McPherson, of Company B; Francis D. Clark, John 
Wolfe and Jacob W. Norris, of Company D; John H. Welsh, of Company E; 
Lieutenant Jeremiah Sherwood, of Company G; George Van Vechten, of Com- 



pany H; Joseph Evans and Frank S. Stuart, of Company I. Major Clark pre 
sided, and the evening was spent in recalling incidents pathetic, humorous and 
valuable as historic material. All sorts of escapades in various South Ameri 
can ports were confessed to, and many bits of insight into the quaint ways of 
the native and immigrant population of early California were told. During the 
dinner Roswell D. Baldwin, the second officer of the Loo Choo, entered the 
room and was heartily welcomed. He had seen a notice of the meeting and 
had not before known of the organization of the Gold Bear Veterans. Later in 
the evening letters were read from absent members and from the parent organi 
zation of the regiment's veterans in California. 

The following telegram was received from the venerable Colonel of the 
regiment at San Francisco: 
" Comrades assembled at New York: 

" On my bended knees I ask God's blessing on you all. 

"JONATHAN D. STEVENSON." 

The memory of dead comrades was duly honored and many speeches of con 
gratulation over the growth of the State which each one present had assisted in 
establishing were made. After midnight there were many empty bottles and 
some wonderful efforts in talking Mexican Spanish from memory. 



Gen'l Edward O. C. Ord, United States Army, died at Havana, 
Cuba, Sunday evening, July 22, 1883, of yellow fever. In 1847-8 
he was a Lieutenant of Co. F, 3d U. S. Artillery, and was sta 
tioned at Monterey, Cal. Members of Stevenson's regiment will 
remember this officer especially those of Co. " D " and " I," 
with whom his duties were so closely identified during their 
term of service in California. 



i6 

AN INTERESTING REMINISCENCE. 
THE FOURTH OF JULY AT LOS ANGELES IN i84 7 . 

First celebration of the glorious anniversary of our National Independence, in 
California, by order of Col. Stevenson; the Stars and Stripes unfurled 
from the heights of Los Angeles. 

Head-quarters Southern Military Disirict, 

Ciudad De Los Angeles, July ?d, 1847. 

Order No. i. The 'anniversary of the birthday of American Independence 
will be celebrated at this port in a manner as worthy of the occasion as our 
means will admit, and if we cannot greet its return by a display of as much 
pomp and ceremony as will no doubt be made at many ports within our own 
native land, we will be unsurpassed by a proper demonstration of that pure 
heart-fell joy, which should animate the heart of every lover of freedom and 
free institutions throughout the civilized world upon the happy return of this 
glorious day. 

At sunrise a Federal salute will be fired from the field-work on the hill, 
which commands this town, and for the first time from this point the American 
standard is displayed. 

At 10 o'clock every soldier at this post will be under arms. The detach 
ment of the Seventh Regiment of N. Y. Volunteers and the first Regiment of 
U. S. Dragoons (dismounted), will be marched to the field-work on the hill, 
under the command of their respective senior officers present, when, togetner 
with the Mormon Battalion, the whole will be formed at n o'clock A. M. into a 
hollow square, when the Declaration of Independence will be read. 

At the close of this ceremony, the field-works will he dedicated and appro 
priately named, and at 12 o'clock a national salute will be fired, which will close 
the ceremonies of the day. 

Lieutenant Smith commanding detachment of U. S. Dragoons, will cause a 
proper detail to be made from his command to fire the salute. 

The field-work at this post, having been planned, and the work conducted 
entirely by A. A. Quarter-Master Davidson of the 1st Regiment Dragoons, he 
is requested to hoist upon it, for the first time, on the morning of the Fourth, 
the American standard. 

It is the custom of our country to confer on its fortifications the name of 
some distinguished individual, who has rendered important services to his 
country, either in the councils of the nation or on the battle-field. The Com 
mandant has therefore determined, unless the Department of War shall other 
wise direct, to confer upon the field-work, erected at the port of Los Angeles, 
the name of one who was regarded, by all who had the pleasure of his acquaint 
ance, as a perfect specimen of an American officer, and whose character, for 
every virtue and accomplishment that adorns a gentleman, was only equalled by 
the reputation he had acquired in the field for his gallantry as an officer and 
soldier, and his life was sacrificed in the conquest of this territory at the battle 
of San Pasqual. The Commander directs, that from and after the 4th instant, 
it shall bear the name of Moore. 

Circumstances, over which we have no control, have prevented the com 
mand at this port being completely uniformed, but each officer and soldier will 
appear on the Fourth with the perfect equipments of his corps as f >r as he has 
them, and most perfect cleanliness, as well in arms and accoutrements as in 
person, will be required of all. Each department will be minutely inspected 
before assembling on the hill. By order of 

COL. J. D. STEVENSON, 

J. C. BONNYCASTLE, 

First Lieut, and Adjt.